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The so-far expertly crafted script

iostat -p -x 1 2| grep $1[^[:digit:]] | awk '{print $9}'

will return two lines:

0.16
0.00

because iostat is taking two samples. But you already knew that. My question is since you and I both know it will be exactly two lines every time, how I pick out exactly the second?

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What's with the reader flattery? Straightforward questions are generally easier to read. –  nneonneo Sep 19 '12 at 22:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Add NR==2 before {print $9} to tell awk to match record 2.

For example, on my system,

$ iostat -x /dev/sda 1 2 | grep sda

$ iostat -x /dev/sda 1 2 | grep sda | awk 'NR==1 {print $9}'

$ iostat -x /dev/sda 1 2 | grep sda | awk 'NR==2 {print $9}'

produced

sda               0.11     1.04    2.00    1.28   125.95    63.24   115.15     0.07   21.04    4.66   46.60   2.36   0.78
sda               0.00     0.00    0.00    0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00   0.00   0.00
0.07
0.00

where that "0.00" line is the result of the third command.

Additional note: It isn't necessary to run a separate grep command, as awk can match text. However, the awk script then needs an index variable. The first of the following examples is a simple grep to show what awk works on. The next two examples are straightforward awk code that has a match test to increment an index and another match test plus index test to print. The last example shows how to get rid of extra appearances of the match expression. Note, in these examples I replaced print $9 with print for clarity, and $1[^[:digit:]] with sda[^0-9]. Here are the examples which do the matching in awk instead of in grep:

$ iostat -p -x 1 2  | grep 'sda '
sda               0.11     1.04    2.00    1.28   125.70    63.16   115.09     0.07   21.04    4.66   46.57   2.36   0.78
sda               0.00     0.00    0.00    0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00   0.00   0.00

$ iostat -p -x 1 2  | awk '/sda[^0-9]/ {++t} t==1 && /sda[^0-9]/ {print}'
sda               0.11     1.04    2.00    1.28   125.70    63.16   115.09     0.07   21.04    4.66   46.57   2.36   0.78

$ iostat -p -x 1 2  | awk '/sda[^0-9]/ {++t} t==2 && /sda[^0-9]/ {print}'
sda               0.00     0.00    0.00    0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00   0.00   0.00

$ iostat -p -x 1 4  | awk '/sda[^0-9]/ && t++ && t==2 {print}'
sda               0.00     0.00    0.00    0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00   0.00   0.00
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Works as intended on my system, but seems like it's printing everything on yours instead of one field? –  mvd Sep 19 '12 at 22:23
    
In my answer, the first 2 lines of output are from iostat -x /dev/sda 1 2 | grep sda, ie, not followed by awk. The other two lines of output show the results with NR==1 or NR==2 in place. (Note, I edited answer to use sda instead of sdf, and in a minute will add a comment on that.) –  jwpat7 Sep 19 '12 at 22:29
    
@Mikhail, I added a note about how to do the grep from within awk. For this application, it doesn't help much at all to match the lines in awk instead of in grep, but in other cases it will be more flexible or more general to do so. –  jwpat7 Sep 19 '12 at 23:15

Pipe it to tail -1, this will select the last line.

iostat -p -x 1 2| grep $1[^[:digit:]] | awk '{print $9}' | tail -1
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Combining head and tail lets you select any sequence of lines from the input:

(cmd) | tail -n+2 | head -n 1

gets the second line of input no matter how long the command's output is.

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