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I want to e-mail my apk file to someone. I started by just copying the apk file from my /bin folder, but when it was installed on the other device it got a Parse Error. I have been looking around SO and found some questions where people say to export the file. I started the export process but it is asking me to create a keystore. I'm not quite sure what that even is, but from what I have read it is how you sign your application.

Is there anyway to send an apk file to someone without signing the application?

If the user sets their tablet into debug mode, does the application need to be signed?

It runs on my test device, is that because I am running it through eclipse?

If I need to sign my application, is it a permanent move, or can I go back and edit what I have done?

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Read official dev guide - Signing Your Applications, It answers all your question.

Is there anyway to send an apk file to someone without signing the application?

Yes, via email, flash driver and etc. but they will no able to install them.

If the user sets their tablet into debug mode, does the application need to be signed?

All applications must be signed. The system will not install an application on an emulator or a device if it is not signed.

It runs on my test device, is that because I am running it through eclipse?

To test and debug your application, the build tools sign your application with a special debug key that is created by the Android SDK build tools.

If I need to sign my application, is it a permanent move, or can I go back and edit what I have done?

Generally speaking, you can edit everything your want in code, the signing is only for release process for Google Play, if you want your user receive update, use the same keystore signing the modified apk. So be sure to keep your own private keystore file safely, probably in the cloud, as the same private key is not re-creatable. see the dev guide for more details.

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Thanks, my application is on my SD card and I can see it in ASTRO, but when I click on it application manager just doesn't show up. Is that because its not signed? On the other device I received a Parse Error, but here just nothing. If you don't know, thanks anyway. –  JuiCe Sep 19 '12 at 22:40
    
If you export the apk from Eclipse, it should be automatically signed with the debug keystore. –  yorkw Sep 19 '12 at 22:51
    
OK, I haven't tried anything else yet, but I will shortly. To be honest though, that's what I keep reading which confuses me. If I export the apk from Eclipse and it is automatically signed, then why do I need to create a NEW keystore? –  JuiCe Sep 19 '12 at 23:25
    
To make it simple, you can stay with debug keystore if you don't intent to publish your app in Google Play. For Google Play, debug keystore is not allowed. You can find all details in the one-stop dev guide I linked in the answer. –  yorkw Sep 19 '12 at 23:38
    
Note that a debug key expires fairly quickly, and once it has expired applications signed with it cannot be installed (though installed copies should continue to work). This would also mean you could not provide an update to your application without changing keys, and changing keys means your users loose any app-private data stored by the old version. –  Chris Stratton Aug 7 at 15:15

If you're working with Eclipse, you can right-click on the project and select "Android Tools > Export Unsigned Application" (or Signed Application if you want).

I don't know if Android will allow an unsigned application to be installed, however. Probably not, is my guess.

Is there some reason you don't want to sign it? It's really not hard.

If you're working from Mac or Linux, it's easy to do from the command line:

If you have Java installed on your system, keytool should already be in your path. You'll want to also put androidsdk/tools/ in your path as well, or you can type out the full path whenever you want to use it.

Just give these commands:

  keytool -genkey -alias JuiCe -validity 20000 -keystore ~/.android/my-keystore
  jarsigner -keystore ~/.android/my-keystore myApplication.apk JuiCe
  zipalign -v 4 myApplication.apk myapp.zip

Then send myapp.zip to your user.

Edited to add:

I think yorkw has the better answer.

I also wanted to mention that the debug signature that Eclipse used to sign your apk for you should have worked. I suspect the apk was corrupted somehow when delivered to your user. Or perhaps you installed it wrong.

First, on the receiving device, you need to go to Settings > Applications and check Unknown sources.

Next, if adb is available, do "adb install myapp.apk".

If adb is not available, place the apk file somewhere on the sdcard and run a file manager (OIFileManager or Astro are good choices). The file manager will allow you to install the apk on your device.

You can also have your user download the apk from the internet. Then the browser's downloads menu item will allow you to install it.

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