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Here's the code that has the symptoms:

      /*
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 * and open the template in the editor.
 */
package com.zove.xuggleraudio;

import com.xuggle.xuggler.IAudioSamples;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.IContainer;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.IStream;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.IStreamCoder;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.ICodec;
import com.xuggle.xuggler.IPacket;

import javax.sound.sampled.AudioFormat;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioSystem;
import javax.sound.sampled.DataLine;
import javax.sound.sampled.Line;
import javax.sound.sampled.LineUnavailableException;

import javax.sound.sampled.SourceDataLine;

/**
 * Class that represents an audio player with the expected
 * controls (start, stop, pause, resume).
 * @author Mciavilli
 */
public class Audio 
{
    //The name of the file to be played
    private final String filename;
    //Our connection to the mixer
    private final SourceDataLine mLine;
    //The index of the audio stream inside the file
    private final int audioId;
    //Xuggler media container
    private final IContainer container;
    //The stream decoder
    private final IStreamCoder streamCoder;

    /*
     * Constructor that takes a String argument
     */
    public Audio(String filename)
    {
        this.filename = filename;
        //Create Xuggler container object
        this.container = IContainer.make();
        //Open the container
        if(container.open(filename, IContainer.Type.READ, null) < 0)
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid file name: " + this.filename);
        //find the audio stream within contained streams
        this.audioId = getAudioId(container);
        //get the audio stream
        IStream stream = container.getStream(audioId);
        //get the stream decoder
        this.streamCoder = stream.getStreamCoder();
        //open the stream decoder
        if (this.streamCoder.open() < 0)
            throw new RuntimeException("could not open audio decoder for container: "
              + filename);
        //Get a pipe to the sound mixer
        this.mLine = readySoundSystem(streamCoder);
    }

    private int getAudioId(IContainer container)
    {
        //see how many streams are there
        int numStreams = container.getNumStreams();
        int audioId = -1;
        for(int i = 0; i < numStreams ; i++)
        {
            IStream stream = container.getStream(i);
            IStreamCoder streamCoder = stream.getStreamCoder();
            if(streamCoder.getCodecType() == ICodec.Type.CODEC_TYPE_AUDIO)
                audioId = i;
                break;
        }//end for statement
        //No audio stream found
        if(audioId == -1)
            throw new RuntimeException("Failed to find an audio stream in:" +
                    this.filename);

        return audioId;
    }//end method getAudioId

    private SourceDataLine readySoundSystem(IStreamCoder aAudioCoder)
    {
        AudioFormat audioFormat = new AudioFormat(aAudioCoder.getSampleRate(),
            (int)IAudioSamples.findSampleBitDepth(aAudioCoder.getSampleFormat()),
            aAudioCoder.getChannels(),
            true, /* xuggler defaults to signed 16 bit samples */
            false);
        DataLine.Info info = new DataLine.Info(SourceDataLine.class, audioFormat);
        try
        {
          SourceDataLine mLine = (SourceDataLine) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
          /**
           * if that succeeded, try opening the line.
           */
          mLine.open(audioFormat);
          /**
           * And if that succeed, start the line.
           */
          mLine.start();
        }
        catch (LineUnavailableException e)
        {
          throw new RuntimeException("could not open audio line");
        }
        return mLine;
      }//end method readySoundSystem
    /*
     * starts playing the file.
     * returns true if successful.
     * should be called only once per Audio object
     */ 
    public boolean start()
    {
        if(!mLine.isActive())
        {
            IPacket packet = IPacket.make();
            while(container.readNextPacket(packet) >= 0)
            {
              /*
               * Now we have a packet, let's see if it belongs to our audio stream
               */
              if (packet.getStreamIndex() == this.audioId)
              {
                /*
                 * We allocate a set of samples with the same number of channels as the
                 * coder tells us is in this buffer.
                 * 
                 * We also pass in a buffer size (1024 in our example), although Xuggler
                 * will probably allocate more space than just the 1024 (it's not important why).
                 */
                IAudioSamples samples = IAudioSamples.make(1024, this.streamCoder.getChannels());

                /*
                 * A packet can actually contain multiple sets of samples (or frames of samples
                 * in audio-decoding speak).  So, we may need to call decode audio multiple
                 * times at different offsets in the packet's data.  We capture that here.
                 */
                int offset = 0;

                /*
                 * Keep going until we've processed all data
                 */
                while(offset < packet.getSize())
                {
                  int bytesDecoded = this.streamCoder.decodeAudio(samples, packet, offset);
                  if (bytesDecoded < 0)
                    throw new RuntimeException("got error decoding audio in: " + filename);
                  offset += bytesDecoded;
                  /*
                   * Some decoder will consume data in a packet, but will not be able to construct
                   * a full set of samples yet.  Therefore you should always check if you
                   * got a complete set of samples from the decoder
                   */
                  if (samples.isComplete())
                  {
                    playSound(samples);
                  }
                }//end inner while block
              }//end inner if block
              else
              {
                /*
                 * This packet isn't part of our audio stream, so we just silently drop it.
                 */
                do {} while(false);
              }//end else block
            }//end outer while block
            //success!
            return true;
     }//end outer if block
        //The sound is already playing
        return false;
    }//end method start

    private void playSound(IAudioSamples aSamples)
      {
        /**
         * We're just going to dump all the samples into the line.
         */
        byte[] rawBytes = aSamples.getData().getByteArray(0, aSamples.getSize());
        this.mLine.write(rawBytes, 0, aSamples.getSize());
      }//end method playJavaSound

    /*
     * stops the playback
     * returns true if suucessful
     */
    public boolean stop()
    {
        if(mLine.isActive())
        {
            this.mLine.stop();
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) throws InterruptedException 
    {
        if(args.length != 1)
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("illegal arguments passed");
        Audio audio = new Audio(args[0]);
        audio.start();
        Thread.sleep(10 * 1000);
        audio.stop();
    }

}//end class Audio

The line that causes the problem is line 104:

mLine.start();

When i checked the debugger, the mLine object (a SourceDataLine object) is fine until this line is executed, which causes mLine to equal 'null'.

I think this problem is the same as here.

I also tried to use Clip instead of SourceDataLine which ended up having the same issue.

What's interesting is that this problem doesn't happen in the original Xuggler program, and calling start() didn't have that bad effect.

share|improve this question
1  
The fact that you can invoke start() means that mLine isn't null at that point. Are you sure you are reading the debugger correctly? What happens if you run the code normally (i.e. what problem do you see?) –  DNA Sep 19 '12 at 22:24
    
Hey joe yuxuan here –  Ewen Sep 19 '12 at 22:35
    
The object is null after the call to start().which causes NullPointerException at "if(!mLine.isActive())". –  MadeOfAir Sep 19 '12 at 22:42

2 Answers 2

You have both a member variable mLine and a local variable mLine. Only the latter ever gets assigned. When it falls out of scope, what you see in the debugger is the member variable, which is still null.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, "mLine" is actually nulled before the method "readySoundSystem" ever finishes.If you observe, i'm returning the local "mLine" to be saved in the member variable.The last line of the constructor "this.mLine = readySoundSystem(streamCoder);".The returned "mLine" is null just after the call to "mLine.start();" and before "return mLine;". –  MadeOfAir Sep 20 '12 at 12:30
    
@MadeOfAir You don't understand your own code. The mLine you are returning is the member variable, which has never stopped being null. The local mLine you initialized fell out of scope after the try block. –  EJP Sep 25 '12 at 23:44

EJP is correct above in that your mLine variable is scoped only to the try block. (I had to run it in the debugger myself before it made sense to me. Syntax highlighting helped afterwards, coloring my instance variable different than the local variable.) The mLine you return is actually the instance variable.

    try
    {
      SourceDataLine mLine = (SourceDataLine) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
      /**
       * if that succeeded, try opening the line.
       */
      mLine.open(audioFormat);
      /**
       * And if that succeed, start the line.
       */
      mLine.start();
    }
    catch (LineUnavailableException e)
    {
      throw new RuntimeException("could not open audio line");
    }
    return mLine;

Is essentially the same as:

    try
    {
      SourceDataLine mLine = (SourceDataLine) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
      /**
       * if that succeeded, try opening the line.
       */
      mLine.open(audioFormat);
      /**
       * And if that succeed, start the line.
       */
      mLine.start();
    }
    catch (LineUnavailableException e)
    {
      throw new RuntimeException("could not open audio line");
    }
    return this.mLine;

because the return mLine is outside the try block that it was declared in. In practice re-using the name of an instance variable as a local variable is not safe for this very reason. If you attempt to rename the variable to something like "line" using the refactoring tool in an IDE like Eclipse or Idea then it will only rename the references in the try scope further highlighting your bug.

    try
    {
      SourceDataLine line = (SourceDataLine) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
      /**
       * if that succeeded, try opening the line.
       */
      line.open(audioFormat);
      /**
       * And if that succeed, start the line.
       */
      line.start();
    }
    catch (LineUnavailableException e)
    {
      throw new RuntimeException("could not open audio line");
    }
    return mLine;

If you then try to manually re-key the reference in the return statement you will get a compile error.

    try
    {
      SourceDataLine line = (SourceDataLine) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
      /**
       * if that succeeded, try opening the line.
       */
      line.open(audioFormat);
      /**
       * And if that succeed, start the line.
       */
      line.start();
    }
    catch (LineUnavailableException e)
    {
      throw new RuntimeException("could not open audio line");
    }
    return line; //Will not compile!

The proper fix is to tuck the return statement inside the try block:

    try
    {
      SourceDataLine line = (SourceDataLine) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
      /**
       * if that succeeded, try opening the line.
       */
      line.open(audioFormat);
      /**
       * And if that succeed, start the line.
       */
      line.start();
      return line;
    }
    catch (LineUnavailableException e)
    {
      throw new RuntimeException("could not open audio line");
    }
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