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When I loop through a vector of vectors, the result of each loop is several vectors. I would expect the result of each loop to be a vector. Please see the following example:

> foo <- seq(from=1, to=5, by=1)
> bar <- seq(from=6, to=10, by=1)
> baz <- seq(from=11, to=15, by=1)
> vects <- c(foo,bar,baz)
> for(v in vects) {print(v)}
[1] 1
[1] 2
[1] 3
[1] 4
[1] 5
[1] 6
[1] 7
[1] 8
[1] 9
[1] 10
[1] 11
[1] 12
[1] 13
[1] 14
[1] 15

This is odd as I would expect three vectors given it (should) iterate three times given the vector, c(foo,bar,baz). Something like:

[1]  1  2  3  4  5
[1]  6  7  8  9 10
[1] 11 12 13 14 15

Can anyone explain why I am getting this result (15 vectors) and how to achieve the result I am looking for (3 vectors)?

share|improve this question
1  
There's no such thing as a vector of vectors in R. The function c just concatenates the three vectors you give it into one long vector. –  Seth Sep 19 '12 at 22:46
3  
@Seth, yes there is a vector of vectors. A list is the generic vector in R and it can contain vectors. We might call them lists but as far as R is concerned it is a vector. (As compared to an atomic vector which holds only one data type, a list is a vector the elements of which can hold any data type.) –  Gavin Simpson Sep 19 '12 at 22:50
2  
I wonder why this was downvoted? What is wrong? The question is clear and reproducible, and contains expected output. I am at a loss to know why this Q was worthy of a downvote, especially one without a comment to say why?! –  Gavin Simpson Sep 19 '12 at 23:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Look at what vects is:

> vects
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15

The c() joins (in this case) the three vectors, concatenating them into a single vector. In the for() loop, v takes on each values in vects in turn and prints it, hence the result you see.

Did you want a list of the three separate vectors? If so

> vects2 <- list(foo, bar, baz)
> for(v in vects2) {print(v)}
[1] 1 2 3 4 5
[1]  6  7  8  9 10
[1] 11 12 13 14 15

In other words, form a list of the vectors, not a combination of the vectors.

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Great explanation, thank you. –  user1515534 Sep 20 '12 at 13:31

Substitute vects <- list(foo,bar,baz) for vects <- c(foo,bar,baz).

There is no such thing (really) as a vector of vectors.

share|improve this answer
    
I beg to differ on the last point; a list is a vector (it is a generic vector) & it can contain vectors (as you show), so... ;-) –  Gavin Simpson Sep 19 '12 at 22:48
    
@GavinSimpson Sigh. Correct as usual, King Gavin! :) –  joran Sep 19 '12 at 22:49
    
+1 anyway, and especially for calling me King. I rule! :) –  Gavin Simpson Sep 19 '12 at 22:51

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