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Here is my code:

int main() { 
    int x, y; 
    int *xptr, *yptr; 
    int array[10][10]; 
    int j; 
    int k; 
    int z = 0; 

    for(j = 0; j < 10; j++) { 
        for(k = 0; k < 10; k++) { 
            array[j][k] = j * 10 + k; 
        } 
    } 

    xptr = &array[0][0]; 

    for(j = 0; j < 10; j++) { 
        for(k = 0; k < 10; k++) { 
            printf("array[%d][%d] = %d \n", j, k, *(xptr + j), (xptr + k)); 
        } 
    } 

    system("PAUSE"); 
}

I am trying to initialize a 2d array so that at [0][0] it equals 0 and at [9][9] it equals 99. With the way that it is now, [0][0-9] all equal 0 and then [1][0-9] all equal 1. How would I properly load this array in the fashion that I mentioned?

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Where is z coming from? I see no declaration. –  Ed S. Sep 19 '12 at 22:44
    
Oh and z is initialized to 0. –  Deafsilver Sep 19 '12 at 22:44
    
This really should work...how is array declared? Post a complete program that demonstrates the problem. –  nneonneo Sep 19 '12 at 22:46
    
The outside can't be too much different from this one, can it? –  chris Sep 19 '12 at 22:47
    
Have you perhaps accidentally fixed your mistake when typing the code here and in your problematic code the z++ is in the outer loop? –  Daniel Fischer Sep 19 '12 at 22:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
for(j = 0; j < 10; j++) {
      for(k = 0; k < 10; k++) {
            array[j][k] = j*10 + k;
      }
}
share|improve this answer

I'm assuming you've actually declared everything, but didn't include it in the example. You simply want

array[j][k] = j*10 + k;

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