Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a check function:

function checkCandidateEmail($email)
    {
         $email = $_POST;

        if($email)
        {
            $candemail = (SQL);
            if(isset($candemail['email']))
            {
              return TRUE;
            } else {
              return FALSE;
            }

            return $canEmailCheck;
        }
    }

I have started to create a function but I am getting NULL

share|improve this question
    
What is (SQL)? Is that a constant? I don't think they can be arrays. –  Rocket Hazmat Sep 19 '12 at 23:03
1  
$_POST is an array... –  alfasin Sep 19 '12 at 23:04
3  
You're accepting $email as a passed argument, then immediately overwriting it with $email = $_POST; (the POST array). Is this really what you mean to do? Does $_POST actually contain anything? You'll get a NULL return if $_POST is empty –  Mark Baker Sep 19 '12 at 23:04
    
$_POST contains the email –  Jess SM Sep 19 '12 at 23:09
1  
@Jess - $_POST (unless you're messing with PHP superglobals, $_POST is an array, one or more elements of which might contain an email address... but it clearly isn't what you think it is –  Mark Baker Sep 19 '12 at 23:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Please, elaborate more on your questions next time. I am not sure what you attempt to compare, if the $_POST with the SQL query or the argument passed with the SQL query. I assume the former.

If the email from that SQL table row equals the submitted email, returns TRUE. Else, returns FALSE. Really simplified version. Now it also checks if the user provided an email:

function checkCandidateEmail()
    {
    if (!$_POST['email']) echo "Error, please provide an email";
    else
      {
      $candemail = (SQL);   // Return a row from a query
      return $candemail['email'] == $_POST['email'];
      }
    }

If an argument is passed, compares that against the database. If none is passed, compares the submitted $_POST['email'] against the database.

function checkCandidateEmail($email=null)
    {
    $candemail = (SQL);   // Return a row from a query
    if (!$email) $email = $_POST['email'];
    return $candemail['email'] == $email;
    }

NOTE: In both cases you have to substitute SQL for the right string and function depending on your database.

NOTE 2: Make sure that your query returns an email, as this simple code does not check if both strings are empty.

share|improve this answer
    
You can just return $candemail['email'] == $email, no need for ?: :-P –  Rocket Hazmat Sep 20 '12 at 13:47
    
I was JUST about ask a question about a similar case. I realized of that while writing some other code, came back and just saw your comment. I edited it for the sake of KISS. –  Francisco Presencia Sep 20 '12 at 14:16
function checkCandidateEmail($email)
    {
         $email = $_POST; // being immediately overwritten - redundant argument. 

        if($email) // Since $email isn't an optional argument, you'll get a PHP warning if it is missing, making this check confusing.
        {
            $candemail = (SQL); // Evaluating a constant? this will be bool 
            if(isset($candemail['email'])) // Since $candemail is a bool and not an array, this will never return true
            {
              return TRUE;
            } else {
              return FALSE;
            }  // this entire if/else block can be simplified to this: return (isset($candemail['email']));

            return $canEmailCheck; // this is an undefined variable and will never get returned anyway because of the above return statements.
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
the if($email) check isn't totally crazy -- it's possible to call checkCandidateEmail(false) or checkCandidateEmail("") –  Frank Farmer Sep 19 '12 at 23:15
    
I suppose but it's being reassigned as $_POST so it should really be if(!empty($_POST)) –  AlienWebguy Sep 19 '12 at 23:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.