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Given a large dictionary, (actually, a defaultdict) with tens of millions of key-value pairs (strings : integers).

I want to remove about half of the key/value pairs, based on a simple condition (e.g. value > 20) on the values.

What is the fastest way to do this?

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Could you be a little clearer about exactly what the condition is? Is it a regular expression on the keys, or a condition like "foo" in key, or whether the key is 16 bytes, or … –  kojiro Sep 19 '12 at 23:09
    
@kojiro clarified. –  James Sep 19 '12 at 23:11
    
If you're doing this often enough that you really do need the fastest way to do it, you may want to change data structures, or maybe even write your own class that's optimized for this case. From a quick check, using Cocoa's dictionaries and filter methods (via PyObjC) is anywhere from 8x slower to 4x faster for different cases. (I'm not suggesting that you use NSDictionary, just pointing out how much difference you can get makes.) –  abarnert Sep 20 '12 at 1:21
    
One more possibility: Don't actually remove them, just mark them as removed (e.g., set them to None). That should make this step blazingly fast. Of course it means all your actual uses of the dictionary will be more complex and slower (because you have to check for None before using the value), and you'll be wasting a lot of long-term memory, so for most use-cases this is definitely a bad solution. But if removing items is actually your bottleneck, it could conceivably be worth doing. –  abarnert Sep 20 '12 at 20:47
    
@abarnert if I could afford not to remove them, then I wouldn't! I need to make as much free memory as possible for a subsequent part of the program. –  James Sep 20 '12 at 21:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think an iterator-based regeneration of the dict is a good approach:

newdict = dict((k,v) for k,v in d.iteritems() if v > 20)

or

newdict = {k: v for k,v in d.iteritems() if v > 20}

in Python 2.7.

Note that you have to be careful with d = {k: v for k,v in d.iteritems() if v > 20}. Instead you should invoke

d.clear()
d.update({k: v for k,v in d.iteritems() if v > 20})

This way, old references to the data in d will also refer to the filtered data.

Edit:

Let's compare three methods discussed in this thread via benchmark:

The result obviously depends on the proportion of the dictionary to be "deleted" (which is maybe unpredictable but only the thread opener knows). It may also highly depend on the activity of the garbage collection, which is by default switched off during timeit. It is switched off in order to reduce noise in the measurement. However, this can entirely change the ranking of the methods. Let's have a look:

Benchmark code upfront:

from timeit import timeit

n = 2
N = "10**7"
mod = "9999999"
gc = "False"
print "N: %s; mod: %s; garbage collection: %s" % (N, mod, gc)

setup ="""
N = %s
mod = %s
d = {x:1 for x in xrange(N)}
if %s:
    gc.enable()""" % (N, mod, gc)

t = timeit(
'd = {k:v for k, v in d.iteritems() if not k % mod}',
setup=setup,
number=n)
print "%s times method 1 (dict comp): %.3f s" % (n, t)

t = timeit(
'''
for k, v in d.items():
    if k % mod:
        del d[k]
''',
setup=setup,
number=n)
print "%s times method 2 (key deletion within for loop over d.items()): %.3f s" % (n, t)

t = timeit('''
removekeys = [k for k, v in d.iteritems() if k % mod]
for k in removekeys:
    del d[k]
''',
setup=setup,
number=n)
print "%s times method 3 (key deletion after list comp): %.3f s" %(n, t)

Case 1 (none of the items of the dictionary are filtered out):

Garbage collection enabled:

N: 10**7; mod: 1; garbage collection: True
2 times method 1 (dict comp): 4.701
2 times method 2 (key deletion within for loop over d.items()): 15.782
2 times method 3 (key deletion after list comp): 2.024

Garbage collection disabled:

N: 10**7; mod: 1; garbage collection: False
2 times method 1 (dict comp): 4.701
2 times method 2 (key deletion within for loop over d.items()): 4.268
2 times method 3 (key deletion after list comp): 2.027

Case 2 (half of the items of the dictionary are filtered out):

Garbage collection enabled:

N: 10**7; mod: 2; garbage collection: True
2 times method 1 (dict comp): 3.449 s
2 times method 2 (key deletion within for loop over d.items()): 12.862 s
2 times method 3 (key deletion after list comp): 2.765 s

Garbage collection disabled:

N: 10**7; mod: 2; garbage collection: False
2 times method 1 (dict comp): 3.395 s
2 times method 2 (key deletion within for loop over d.items()): 4.175 s
2 times method 3 (key deletion after list comp): 2.893 s

Case 3 (almost all of the items of the dictionary are filtered out):

Garbage collection enabled:

N: 10**7; mod: 9999999; garbage collection: True
2 times method 1 (dict comp): 1.217 s
2 times method 2 (key deletion within for loop over d.items()): 9.298 s
2 times method 3 (key deletion after list comp): 2.141 s

Garbage collection disabled:

N: 10**7; mod: 9999999; garbage collection: False
2 times method 1 (dict comp): 1.213 s
2 times method 2 (key deletion within for loop over d.items()): 3.168 s
2 times method 3 (key deletion after list comp): 2.141 s

Measured on 64bit Python 2.7.3 on Linux 2.6.32-34-generic on a Xeon E5630 with 24 GB memory. Peak memory usage below 10 % (monitored via top).

Conclusion

  1. The performance of method 1 and 3 is independent of the state of the garbage collection.
  2. Method 2 is significantly slowed down by garbage collection. Method 1 and 3 are always faster, except for the case with disabled garbage collection an no item being filtered out.
  3. If most items are expected to be filtered out, use method 1 (the dictionary comprehension). If you expect to throw out up to half (or maybe even more, finer benchmarking required) of the number of keys, then use method 3.

I'd go for method 1 in any case, because it is cleaner code than method 3 and the difference in performance is not large. But that's entirely up to you.

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With Python 2.7 you may as well use a dict comprehension. –  kojiro Sep 19 '12 at 23:16
    
Sure. Thanks, @kojiro! –  Jan-Philip Gehrcke Sep 19 '12 at 23:20
    
Can you tell us: (1) what OS you're on, (2) whether you're using 32- or 64-bit Python, (3) what the peak memory usage is for each test (you need to split it into two separate scripts for that), and (4) whether method 2 is triggering your system to page out memory to swap? Because from what I'm seeing, method 2 is significantly faster, except that in 64-bit Python it can run through enough temporary memory to cause swapping, making things an order of magnitude (linux) or two (Mac) slower instead. –  abarnert Sep 20 '12 at 20:31
    
Yeah, peak memory use is also an important consideration. –  James Sep 28 '12 at 19:19
dict((k,v) for k,v in original_dict.iteritems() if condition)

This creates a new dictionary based on your condition, in a memory-friendly (due to iteritems and generators) and efficient way (not a whole lot of function/method calls).

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For reference:

>>> from timeit import timeit as t
    # Create a new dict with a dict comprehension
>>> t('x={k:v for k, v in x.iteritems() if v % 2}', 'x={x:x for x in xrange(10**7)}', number=30)
100.02150511741638
    # Delete the unneeded entries in-place
>>> t('''for k, v in x.items():
...   if v % 2 != 0:
...     del x[k]''', 'x={x:x for x in xrange(10**7)}', number=30)
89.83732604980469

(I'm assuming the speed of the modulus == 0 comparison is on the same order as < 20, but that's not really relevant to these tests.) They are about the same order of magnitude for a very large dict, but I guess the in-place is a little faster.

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Have you checked equality of both outcomes? –  Jan-Philip Gehrcke Sep 19 '12 at 23:29
    
All your values are 1 ;) –  James Sep 19 '12 at 23:30
    
@Jan-PhilipGehrcke yeah, but then I realized OP asked for values and changed the test without making the values meaningful. Will update shortly as soon as these really long tests finish :) –  kojiro Sep 19 '12 at 23:32
    
@kojiro: I got completely different timing results. Have a look at my answer. –  Jan-Philip Gehrcke Sep 19 '12 at 23:44
    
I think this is going to depend primarily on how often the two methods end up rehashing—which is something that's hard to predict, impossible to control, and quite possibly very different on different people's systems… –  abarnert Sep 20 '12 at 1:23

If you're ok with making a new dict:

dict((k, v) for k,v in D.iteritems() if k != "foo")

If you really want to modify the original:

removekeys = [k for k, v in D.iteritems() if k == "foo"]
for k in removekeys: del D[k]

I'm not sure these are the fast-est, but they should be fast.

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Your second solution is faster than the first one in case there is not much to delete from the dictionary (as expected, cf. the benchmark in my answer). –  Jan-Philip Gehrcke Sep 21 '12 at 12:04

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