Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a question that I can't really answer, so I wonder if someone may shed some light here.

Basically I am interested in knowing what is going on in iOS before and while I run an app...but from the OS perspective.

I've seen a lot of posts regarding what happens when the user tap on an app in the main screen, but I am interested in knowing basically what happens behind the scenes, before that the app takes control and main runs the singleton for UIApplication. And also once that the app is running, is the whole OS blocked in the main run loop of the app or something else is going on?

In particular, I would like to understand who creates the process where UIApplication will run (so the whole app will run inside that process, I assume).

Also would like to know what is the OS doing when for example, I open a connection in an app...since I see that a new thread is created (looking at a crash report I see a bunch of threads running, not just the main one), but I don't get where and who creates them (UIApplication itself?, where they running already before launching the app?).

Hope that the question is clear; I've search all over to find info but all that I get is that when you tap an app, main() runs and calls UIApplication,which takes control, deal with the delegate and views and so on...but what is going in the OS is a mystery.

Is there any resource related to the iOS part? Thanks!

share|improve this question

The operating system of the iPhone works really similar to any other modern operating system. There is a kernel which provides low level functions, an API that provides high level functions (either to applications either to the OS itself) and so on.

There are a lot of processes always alive in the OS itself, just think about the fact that the device is able to receive notifications, receive calls, manage connections and whatever it needs to run.

When you launch an application the only thing that changes is that a process is launched and the control of it is given to the application.

And also once that the app is running, is the whole OS blocked in the main run loop of the app or something else is going on?

The whole OS is not blocked, the process launched is just scheduled together with many other processes that constantly run. This is achieved by multi-tasking.

In particular, I would like to understand who creates the process where UIApplication will run (so the whole app will run inside that process, I assume).

The process is created by the OS itself, which istantiates a new process structure to manage the just launched application and schedule it (with a high priority since it will run in foreground).

(UIApplication itself?, where they running already before launching the app?).

Threads are similar to processes in the sense that they have their code and they actually do something but a thread is lightweight because many thread can be managed by just one process. This mean that your application (or an API call) can create a thread which will run together with the main thread of your application and manage their operations but all these thread will share the same CPU allocation time and the same memory space and whatever. Actually Cocoa hides many of the details from a developer point of view, so that you don't care exactly about which threads are automatically started by the application because you don't need to: they are used to dispatch messages between objects, to manage asyncronous events and whatever.

But this is just the tip of the iceberg, before understanding how iOS works you should learn how a lower level infrastructure works, eg BSD Unix which is actually one of the ancestors of Darwin, which is the kernel on which iOS is operating. After understanding how it works you will undersand also how the infrastructure over it works (which is iOS + its API).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your reply. Indeed my knowledge about the low level architecture is really poor, so I didn't know where to start from. I will take a look at BSD Unix books and see if any of them has some good tutorials that show how the whole system works. – newbiez Sep 19 '12 at 23:44
    
You don't need a book for a specific OS, just take a look here: stackoverflow.com/questions/1437914/… – Jack Sep 19 '12 at 23:46
    
I see, so basically any basic book that talks about OS is good enough to start. I would like to avoid a book that talks about how to write the kernel...all that I want to learn is how it works, so I know where to put my hands when I write an app :) Thanks again Jack! – newbiez Sep 20 '12 at 0:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.