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Getting double free for below code, if a long string passed. I tried all sorts of things. If I remove the free(s) line it goes away. Not sure why it is happening.

void format_str(char *str1,int l,int o) {
    char *s = malloc(strlen(str1)+1);
    char  *s1=s, *b = str1;
    int i=0;
    while(*str1!='\0') {
        i++;
        *s1++=*str1++;

        if(i>=l) {
            if(*str1!=',') {
                continue;
            }
        *s1++=*str1++;
            *s1++='\n';
            for(i=0;i<o;i++) {
                *s1++=' ';
            }
            i = 0;
        }
    }
    *s1 = '\0';
    strcpy(b,s);
    free(s);
}
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3  
How are you getting double frees? There's only one. O_o - you're probably going out of bounds with your pointers or something. –  David Titarenco Sep 20 '12 at 0:37
1  
You're probably writing out of the allocated area. The resetting i = 0 seems very fishy. –  Daniel Fischer Sep 20 '12 at 0:38
2  
You should remove the C++ tag, nothing in this code is C++. –  Borgleader Sep 20 '12 at 0:39
4  
Also, if you insist on posting this kind of monosyllabic train-wreck of a snippet (and you expect people to help debug it), please for the love of God give us an input and an expected output. –  David Titarenco Sep 20 '12 at 0:45
    
deleted my own comment but like what others say... what are single variable parameter names for!!!! like I actually, quite literally mistook that as a programming error if (i >= l) in thinking its if (i >= 1) .... why...... –  t0mm13b Sep 20 '12 at 0:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are almost certainly corrupting the heap. For example:

int main() 
{
    char original[1000] = "some,,,string,,, to,,,,format,,,,,";

    printf( "original starts out %u characters long\n", strlen(original));
    format_str( original, 6, 6);
    printf( "original is now %u characters long\n", strlen(original));

    return 0;
}

would require that the buffer allocated by malloc() be much larger than strlen(str1)+1 in size. Specifically, it would have to be at least 63 bytes long (as the function is coded in the question, the allocation has a size of 35 bytes).

If you need more specific help, you should describe what you're trying to do (such as what are the parameters l and o for?).

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You probably aren't allocating enough space in s for the amount of data you're copying. I don't know what your logic is really doing, but I see stuff like

        *s1++=*str1++;
        *s1++='\n';

where you're copying more than one character into s (via s1) for a single character from str1.

And for the love of all that is computable, use better variable names!

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "use better variable names" - srsly. –  David Titarenco Sep 20 '12 at 0:39

I'll try to reformat your code and guess-rename the variables for sake of mental health.

void format_str(char *str, int minlen, int indent) 
{
    char *tmpstr = malloc( strlen(str) + 1 ); // here is the problem
    char *wrkstr = tmpstr, *savestr = str;
    int count = 0;

    while ( *str != '\0' ) {
        count++;
        *wrkstr++ = *str++;

        if ( count >= minlen ) {

            if ( *str != ',' ) {
                continue;
            }

            *wrkstr++ = *str++;
            *wrkstr++ = '\n';
            for ( count = 0;  count < indent;  count++ ) {
                *wrkstr ++= ' ';
            }
            count = 0;
        }
    }

    *wrkstr = '\0';
    strcpy(savestr,tmpstr);
    free(tmpstr);
}

As others have pointed out you are not allocating sufficient space for the temporary string.

There are two other problems in your code (one of them is a major problem).

You probably should validate your arguments by checking that str is not NULL and maybe also that minlen and indent are not negative. This is not crucial however as a NULL str will just segfault (same behavior of standard library string functions) and values below 1 for minlen and/or indent just behave as if they were 0.

The major problem is with how much space you have in str. You blindly grow the string during formatting and then copy it back to the same memory. This is a buffer overflow waiting to happen (with potentially severe security implications, especially if str happens to point to the stack).

To fix it:

  • You should allocate sufficient space.

  • You should either return the allocated string and stipulate that the caller is responsible for freeing it (like strdup does) or add a parameter that specifies the space available in str and then avoid any work if it's not enought to store the formatted string.

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The use case is a good example for the need of having a the possibility to do a dry-run.

I'd propose you modify your code like so:

ssize_t format_str(const char * input, int p1, int p2, char * output);

1 the target buffer shall be provided by the function caller via the parameter òutput passed to the function

2 the function shall return the number of characters written into the target buffer (negative values might indicated any sort of errors)

3 if the value passed as output is NULL the function does not copy anything but just parses the data referenced by input and determines how many characters would be written into the target buffer and returns this value.

To then use the conversion function one shall call it twice, like so:

char * input = "some,,test   , data,,, ...";
int p1 = <some value>, p2 = <some other value>;
ssize_t ssizeOutput = format_str(input, p1, p2, NULL)
if (0 > ssizeOutput)
{
  exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}
else if (0 < ssizeOutput)
{
  char * output = calloc(ssizeOutput, sizeof(*output));
  if (!output)
  {
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

  ssizeOutput = format_str(input, p1, p2, output);
  if (0 > ssizeOutput)
  {
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }
}
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As others have pointed out, the heap memory is most likely getting corrupted because the code writes beyond the end of the allocated memory.

To verify whether memory is getting corrupted or not is simple. At beginning of function save the length of str1, let's name it 'len_before'. Before calling free(), get the string length again and let's name it 'len_after'.

if (len_after > len_before) then we have a fatal error.

A relatively simple fix would be to pass in the max length that str1 can grow up to, malloc that much memory and stop before exceeding the max length, i.e. truncate it with a null but remain within the limit.

int len_before, len_after;

len_before = strlen(str1) + 1;
.
. /* Rest of the code. */
.
len_after = strlen(str1) + 1;
if (len_after > len_before) {
    printf("fatal error: buffer overflow by %d bytes.\n", len_after - len_before);
    exit(1);
}
free(s);
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