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I would like to use the hierarchical structure of JSON, in a d3 tree layout such as in:

http://bl.ocks.org/1249394

In my work, I am using a variable in javascript:

var treeData = {
  "name" : "A1", "children" : [
    {"name" : "A3", "children": [
      {"name" : "A31", "children" :[
        {"name" : "A311" },
        {"name" : "A312" }
      ]}
    ]}
  ]};

How do I use this hierarchy as a dynamic javascript array, so that values can be pulled and new layers/branches in the hierarchy can be added or removed dynamically? Does this require a loop or empty arrays? I want to be able to create this hierarchy. My main problem is that I don't know how to keep the hierarchical structure in the javascript array code.

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What is the question exactly? –  McGarnagle Sep 20 '12 at 1:25
    
The code you've shown is a JS object with nested arrays of objects, it is not JSON (which is a string representation, i.e., a serialisation of objects/arrays). If you're asking how to add and remove properties from objects you could probably get some tips from the MDN article Working With Objects. –  nnnnnn Sep 20 '12 at 1:28
    
smh. I am sorry for that, yes it is a JS object. I made that mistake as I took the hierarchy out of a JSON file. Basically, I would like to create a nested set of arrays, to reflect this hierarchy structure as shown by the object above. But, I would like to do so dynamically. Any ideas? –  user1684586 Sep 20 '12 at 1:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If I understand your question correctly, after you assign value to treeData as you did above, it's already the hierachy you want. To manipulate them easier, you can do something like

tree.nodes(treeData);

to get an array of objects

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