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Is it possible to pass in a bool variable into an overridden toString() method, so it can conditionally print the object in different formats?

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You may want to look into IFormattable. –  SLaks Sep 20 '12 at 2:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can define overload method of ToString().

public string ToString(bool status){
  //
}
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in the actual print statement how yould you pass the bool to it. Say i wanted to do Console.WriteLine(object). Where do you pass the bool? –  mwhite14 Sep 20 '12 at 2:53
4  
@user1498918: By explicitly calling the method. –  SLaks Sep 20 '12 at 2:54

The typical pattern for parametrized ToString() is to declare an overload with a string parameter.

Example:

class Foo
{
    public string ToString(string format)
    {
        //change behavior based on format
    }
}

For a framework example see Guid.ToString

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No. An overriding method must have the same signature as the method it's overriding. This means that it can't have any more parameters, since that would change the signature. I would just make a new method for the other format you want.

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If you are talking about your own class, you could do the following:

public class MyClass
{
    public bool Flag { get; set; }

    public MyClass()
    {
        Flag = false;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        if (Flag)
        {
            return "Ok";
        }
        else
        {
            return "Bad";
        }
    }
}

And use it

MyClass c = new MyClass();
Console.WriteLine(c); //Bad
c.Flag = true;
Console.WriteLine(c); //Ok
Console.ReadLine();

Your Flag could be some private field and change its value, depending on some inner conditions. It's all up to you.

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