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I recently posted a detailed description of the issue I am facing here at SO. As I couldn't send an actual $http request, I used timeout to simulate asynchronous behavior. Data binding from my model to view is working correct, with the help of @Gloopy

Now, when I use $http instead of $timeout (tested locally), I could see the asynchronous request was successful and data is filled with json response in my service. But, my view is not updating.

updated Plunkr here

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8 Answers

up vote 137 down vote accepted

Here is a Plunk that does what you want: http://plnkr.co/edit/TTlbSv?p=preview

The idea is that you work with promises directly and their "then" functions to manipulate and access the asynchronously returned responses.

app.factory('myService', function($http) {
  var myService = {
    async: function() {
      // $http returns a promise, which has a then function, which also returns a promise
      var promise = $http.get('test.json').then(function (response) {
        // The then function here is an opportunity to modify the response
        console.log(response);
        // The return value gets picked up by the then in the controller.
        return response.data;
      });
      // Return the promise to the controller
      return promise;
    }
  };
  return myService;
});

app.controller('MainCtrl', function( myService,$scope) {
  // Call the async method and then do stuff with what is returned inside our own then function
  myService.async().then(function(d) {
    $scope.data = d;
  });
});

Here is a slightly more complicated version that caches the request so you only make it first time (http://plnkr.co/edit/2yH1F4IMZlMS8QsV9rHv?p=preview):

app.factory('myService', function($http) {
  var promise;
  var myService = {
    async: function() {
      if ( !promise ) {
        // $http returns a promise, which has a then function, which also returns a promise
        promise = $http.get('test.json').then(function (response) {
          // The then function here is an opportunity to modify the response
          console.log(response);
          // The return value gets picked up by the then in the controller.
          return response.data;
        });
      }
      // Return the promise to the controller
      return promise;
    }
  };
  return myService;
});

app.controller('MainCtrl', function( myService,$scope) {
  $scope.clearData = function() {
    $scope.data = {};
  };
  $scope.getData = function() {
    // Call the async method and then do stuff with what is returned inside our own then function
    myService.async().then(function(d) {
      $scope.data = d;
    });
  };
});
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9  
Is there any way to still call the success and error methods in the controller after the service has intercepted with then? –  andyczerwonka Jan 10 '13 at 2:31
1  
@PeteBD If I want to call my myService.async() multiple times from various controllers, how would you organise the service so that is only does the $http.get() for the first request, and all subsequent requests just return a local object array that gets set at the first call to myService.async(). In other words, I want to avoid multiple, needless requests to the JSON service, when really I only need to make one. –  GFoley83 May 16 '13 at 22:05
3  
@GFoley83 - here you go: plnkr.co/edit/2yH1F4IMZlMS8QsV9rHv?p=preview. If you look at the console you'll see that the request is only made once. –  Pete BD May 21 '13 at 7:03
3  
@PeteBD I think you can also use $scope.data = myService.async() directly in the controller. –  Julian Aug 28 '13 at 21:08
2  
@Blowsie- I have updated the Plunks. Here is the original (updated to 1.2RC3): plnkr.co/edit/3Nwxxk?p=preview Here is one using service: plnkr.co/edit/a993Mn?p=preview –  Pete BD Oct 16 '13 at 9:50
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Let it be simple. It's as simple as

  1. Return promise in your service(no need to use then in service)
  2. Use then in your controller

Demo. http://plnkr.co/edit/cbdG5p?p=preview

var app = angular.module('plunker', []);

app.service('myService', function($http) {
  return {
    async: function() {
      return $http.get('test.json');  //1. this returns promise
    }
  };
});

app.controller('MainCtrl', function( myService,$scope) {
  myService.async().then(function(d) { //2. so you can use .then()
    $scope.data = d;
  });
});
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A much better way I think would be something like this:

Service:

app.service('FruitsManager',function($q){

    function getAllFruits(){
        var deferred = $q.defer();

        ...

        // somewhere here use: deferred.resolve(awesomeFruits);

        ...

        return deferred.promise;
    }

    return{
        getAllFruits:getAllFruits
    }

});

And in the controller you can simply use:

$scope.fruits = FruitsManager.getAllFruits();

Angular will automatically put the resolved awesomeFruits into the $scope.fruits.

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deferred.resolve()? Be more precise please and where is the $http call? Also why do you return an object in a .service? –  dalu Apr 2 at 14:40
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I've read http://markdalgleish.com/2013/06/using-promises-in-angularjs-views/ [AngularJS allows us to streamline our controller logic by placing a promise directly on the scope, rather than manually handing the resolved value in a success callback.]

so simply and handy :)

var app = angular.module('myApp', []);
            app.factory('Data', function($http,$q) {
                return {
                    getData : function(){
                        var deferred = $q.defer();
                        var promise = $http.get('./largeLoad').success(function (response) {
                            deferred.resolve(response);
                        });
                        // Return the promise to the controller
                        return deferred.promise; 
                    }
                }
            });
            app.controller('FetchCtrl',function($scope,Data){
                $scope.items = Data.getData();
            });

Hope this help

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doesn't work. the return value of defrred.promise is not a function. –  Pineapple Under the Sea Oct 27 '13 at 16:56
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Related to this I went through a similar problem, but not with get or post made by Angular but with an extension made by a 3rd party (in my case Chrome Extension).
The problem that I faced is that the Chrome Extension won't return then() so I was unable to do it the way in the solution above but the result is still Asynchronous.
So my solution is to create a service and to proceed to a callback

app.service('cookieInfoService', function() {
    this.getInfo = function(callback) {
        var model = {};
        chrome.cookies.get({url:serverUrl, name:'userId'}, function (response) {
            model.response= response;
            callback(model);
        });
    };
});

Then in my controller

app.controller("MyCtrl", function ($scope, cookieInfoService) {
    cookieInfoService.getInfo(function (info) {
        console.log(info);
    });
});

Hope this can help others getting the same issue.

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tosh shimayama have a solution but you can simplify a lot if you use the fact that $http returns promises and that promises can return a value:

app.factory('myService', function($http, $q) {
  myService.async = function() {
    return $http.get('test.json')
    .then(function (response) {
      var data = reponse.data;
      console.log(data);
      return data;
    });
  };

  return myService;
});

app.controller('MainCtrl', function( myService,$scope) {
  $scope.asyncData = myService.async();
  $scope.$watch('asyncData', function(asyncData) {
    if(angular.isDefined(asyncData)) {
      // Do something with the returned data, angular handle promises fine, you don't have to reassign the value to the scope if you just want to use it with angular directives
    }
  });

});

A little demonstration in coffeescript: http://plunker.no.de/edit/ksnErx?live=preview

Your plunker updated with my method: http://plnkr.co/edit/mwSZGK?p=preview

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I'll try further along your approach. But, I like to capture the result in service instead of returning. See the question related to this here stackoverflow.com/questions/12504747/… . I like to process the data returned by $http in different ways in controller. thanks again for your help. –  bsr Sep 20 '12 at 11:50
    
you can use promises in services, if you don't like $watch you can do ´promise.then(function(data){ service.data = data; }, onErrorCallback);` –  Guillaume86 Sep 20 '12 at 11:53
    
I added a plunker forked from yours –  Guillaume86 Sep 20 '12 at 12:02
1  
alternatively you can use $scope.$emit from the service and $scope.$on on the ctrl to tell you controller that the data has returned but I don't really see a benefit –  Guillaume86 Sep 20 '12 at 12:10
    
Finally it works the way I wanted :-). thanks for all the explanation and effort. –  bsr Sep 20 '12 at 14:07
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Because it is asynchronous, the $scope is getting the data before the ajax call is complete.

You could use $q in your service to create promise and give it back to controller, and controller obtain the result within then() call against promise.

In your service,

app.factory('myService', function($http, $q) {
  var deffered = $q.defer();
  var data = [];  
  var myService = {};

  myService.async = function() {
    $http.get('test.json')
    .success(function (d) {
      data = d;
      console.log(d);
      deffered.resolve();
    });
    return deffered.promise;
  };
  myService.data = function() { return data; };

  return myService;
});

Then, in your controller:

app.controller('MainCtrl', function( myService,$scope) {
  myService.async().then(function() {
    $scope.data = myService.data();
  });
});
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1  
+1 i like this one the best as it's more OO than the others. However is there any reason you don't do this this.async = function() { and this.getData = function() {return data} ? I hope you get what i mean –  bicycle Oct 21 '13 at 8:55
    
@bicycle I wanted it the same way but it won't work because the promise has to be resolved all the way. If you don't and try to access it as you normally would, you'll get a reference error when accessing the internal data. Hope it makes sense? –  uhsarp Oct 25 '13 at 20:16
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When binding the UI to your array you'll want to make sure you update that same array directly by setting the length to 0 and pushing the data into the array.

Instead of this (which set a different array reference to data which your UI won't know about):

 myService.async = function() {
    $http.get('test.json')
    .success(function (d) {
      data = d;
    });
  };

try this:

 myService.async = function() {
    $http.get('test.json')
    .success(function (d) {
      data.length = 0;
      for(var i = 0; i < d.length; i++){
        data.push(d[i]);
      }
    });
  };

Here is a fiddle that shows the difference between setting a new array vs emptying and adding to an existing one. I couldn't get your plnkr working but hopefully this works for you!

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that didn't work. in console log, I could see d is updated properly in success callback, but not data. May be the function is already executed. –  bsr Sep 20 '12 at 11:45
    
This method should definitely work maybe it has something to do with the data type of d not being an array (in asp.net you'd need to access d.d for the array for example). See this plnkr for an example pushing a string into the array on error: plnkr.co/edit/7FuwlN?p=preview –  Gloopy Sep 20 '12 at 16:37
1  
angular.copy(d, data) will also work. When a destination is supplied to the copy() method, it will first delete the destination's elements, and then copy in the new ones from the source. –  Mark Rajcok Feb 8 '13 at 16:38
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