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I am currently experimenting with reflection and I recently came across a question. I have this method, which calculates the size (unit: bytes) of a class consisting only of primitive typed fields (excluding booleans) as follows:

import java.lang.reflect.Field;

public class Foo {

    // [...]   

    // Works only for classes with primitive typed fields (excluding booleans)
    public int getSize() {
        int size = 0;

        for (Field f : getClass().getDeclaredFields()) {
            try {
                f.setAccessible(true);
                Object obj = f.get(this);
                Field objField = obj.getClass().getDeclaredField("SIZE");
                int fieldSize = (int) objField.get(obj);
                size += fieldSize / Byte.SIZE;
            } catch (Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }

        return size;
    }

}

As you can see the method cannot be static, since it contains non-static stuff like getClass() and this. However, for every instance of this class the return value of getSize() will be the same, which also holds for every class which extends Foo (of course, with a different value). Hence, conceptually getSize() has a static nature.

Is there a way to make this method static? I thought of using a static class reference like Foo.class to get around getClass() but this would basically destroy the semantics of getSize() for classes which extend Foo. I currently do not think it is possible since static methods are not inherited, but I am not 100% sure if there might be a little tweak to handle this issue.

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If you want to make the method static then you have to change it to take an argument of type Foo. –  Bhesh Gurung Sep 20 '12 at 3:51
1  
Both answers suggesting passing Foo as an argument are valid.; You may also want to consider whether it is in the nature of Foo to have such a method, or whether you would want to externalise it to some utility Class. –  Romski Sep 20 '12 at 4:31
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

So what's wrong with doing something like

public static int getSize(Object parent) {
    int size = 0;

    for (Field f : parent.getClass().getDeclaredFields()) {
        try {
            f.setAccessible(true);
            Object obj = f.get(parent);
            Field objField = obj.getClass().getDeclaredField("SIZE");
            int fieldSize = (Integer) objField.get(obj);
            size += fieldSize / Byte.SIZE;
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    return size;
}
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I wouldn't name the object "parent" but the rest looks o.k. –  user949300 Sep 20 '12 at 5:14
    
@user949300 yeah, but the OP had already stolen obj :( –  MadProgrammer Sep 20 '12 at 5:17
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Instead of getClass(), you could use Foo.class to obtain a reference to the Class object.

However, if you need an instance of class Foo, you still have to create it someplace. If the class has a default constructor, you could use Foo.class.newInstance(). Otherwise, use reflection to obtain a list of constructors and call the correct one.

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