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I have this query :

SELECT B.id, B.name, D.id, D.name FROM TBB B, TDD D
WHERE (D.id = B.id OR D.id IS NULL)

From what I thought, (D.id = B.id OR D.id IS NULL) will show record that have id in both table TBB and TDD the but also show all of B.id records even if both table doesn't have the same id because of D.id IS NULL

So, Is this the same one like my above query :

 SELECT B.id, B.name, D.id, D.name FROM TBB B, TDD D
    WHERE B.id = D.id (+)

Thanks in advance!

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Yes, it's equivalent. Can't you just run and see that it returns the same resultset ? –  alfasin Sep 20 '12 at 4:52
    
Well then I am doing it right, Am I? –  RedFux227 Sep 20 '12 at 6:15
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2 Answers 2

second query will return all the row exist in TBB table, not matching column in TDD table would return as NULL.

in-case TDD table have any ID that doesn't match with TBB table ID , that row will not return by above two query.

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So my guess for the first query is right then? –  RedFux227 Sep 20 '12 at 4:56
    
for your first query, actually single null values in table TDD will match the each unique row in TBB table. –  sola Sep 20 '12 at 5:22
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I am pretty sure that your top query would result in a cartesian join to every record in B for records that have a NULL due to the or statement in your query.

Based on that, you would be better off using the outer join.

I also wrote a lengthy Q&A that looks at joins and how to pull data from multiple tables you might be interested in ( How can an SQL query return data from multiple tables ) it covers unions, inner and outer joins as well as subqueries. It has loads of code and output results which are explained in detail. (To the point I hit the answer length limit, so had to post a second answer)

Edit: After running a quick test, this is what I come up with:

    mysql> select a.ID, a.Title, b.Name as Author
    from books a join authors b
    on a.authorID=b.ID or b.id=0;

    +----+----------------------+-------------------+
    | ID | Title                | Author            |
    +----+----------------------+-------------------+
    |  1 | Call of the Wild     | Fluffeh           |
    |  1 | Call of the Wild     | Jack London       |
    |  2 | Martin Eden          | Fluffeh           |
    |  2 | Martin Eden          | Jack London       |
    |  3 | Old Goriot           | Fluffeh           |
    |  3 | Old Goriot           | Honore de Balzac  |
    |  4 | Cousin Bette         | Fluffeh           |
    |  4 | Cousin Bette         | Honore de Balzac  |
    |  5 | Jew Suess            | Fluffeh           |
    |  5 | Jew Suess            | Lion Feuchtwanger |
    |  6 | Nana                 | Fluffeh           |
    |  6 | Nana                 | Emile Zola        |
    |  7 | The Belly of Paris   | Fluffeh           |
    |  7 | The Belly of Paris   | Emile Zola        |
    |  8 | In Cold blood        | Fluffeh           |
    |  8 | In Cold blood        | Truman Capote     |
    |  9 | Breakfast at Tiffany | Fluffeh           |
    |  9 | Breakfast at Tiffany | Truman Capote     |
    +----+----------------------+-------------------+
    18 rows in set (0.00 sec)

    mysql> select a.ID, a.Title, b.Name as Author
    from books a right outer join authors b
    on a.authorID=b.ID;
    +------+----------------------+-------------------+
    | ID   | Title                | Author            |
    +------+----------------------+-------------------+
    | NULL | NULL                 | Fluffeh           |
    |    1 | Call of the Wild     | Jack London       |
    |    2 | Martin Eden          | Jack London       |
    |    3 | Old Goriot           | Honore de Balzac  |
    |    4 | Cousin Bette         | Honore de Balzac  |
    |    5 | Jew Suess            | Lion Feuchtwanger |
    |    6 | Nana                 | Emile Zola        |
    |    7 | The Belly of Paris   | Emile Zola        |
    |    8 | In Cold blood        | Truman Capote     |
    |    9 | Breakfast at Tiffany | Truman Capote     |
    +------+----------------------+-------------------+
    10 rows in set (0.00 sec) 

Which is certainly not the same as an outer join. As I thought (at least in MySQL) the results cartesian in the first statement, but not in the outer join.

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Hmm, The NULL is attached to the D, right? –  RedFux227 Sep 20 '12 at 4:59
    
Yes, but becuase there is an OR statement in the where clause, the ones in the D is null section aren't joined on a particular field and I think it will match every row from D which has the NULL with EVERY row from B. Having said that, what do you get when you run it? –  Fluffeh Sep 20 '12 at 5:02
    
But I'm using ( ) on my where condition. Isn't that helped to group the where condition? –  RedFux227 Sep 20 '12 at 5:06
    
@RedFux227 See Edit, I added an example. They are not the same. –  Fluffeh Sep 20 '12 at 5:17
    
@RedFux227 You have nothing outside the ( ) so it makes no difference whether you have them or not. –  Fluffeh Sep 20 '12 at 5:18
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