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I need to execute some amount of tasks 4 at a time, something like this:

ExecutorService taskExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);
while(...) {
    taskExecutor.execute(new MyTask());
}
//...wait for completion somehow

How can I get notified once all of them are complete? For now I can't think about anything better than setting some global task counter and decrease it at the end of every task, then monitor in infinite loop this counter to become 0; or get a list of Futures and in infinite loop monitor isDone for all of them. What are better solutions not involving infinite loops?

Thanks.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 80 down vote accepted

Basically on an ExecutorService you call shutdown() and then awaitTermination():

ExecutorService taskExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);
while(...) {
  taskExecutor.execute(new MyTask());
}
taskExecutor.shutdown();
try {
  taskExecutor.awaitTermination(Long.MAX_VALUE, TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS);
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
  ...
}
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1  
It's a common pattern. Transient threadpools like the above are good for several reasons and I pretty much always prefer them to persistent threadpools where a lot more can go wrong or at least it can be harder to figure out. The above is really straightforward which is why I like it. –  cletus Aug 9 '09 at 5:29
1  
this is exactly what shutdown / awaitTermination are meant for –  matt b Aug 9 '09 at 14:31
6  
It is a good pattern if this task handling is a one-time event. If this is done repeatedly during the same runtime, however, it is not optimal, as you would create and tear down threads repeatedly every time it is executed. –  sjlee Aug 9 '09 at 16:25
13  
I'm looking for any official documentation that Long.MAX_VALUE, TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS is equivalent to not having a timeout. –  280Z28 Aug 22 '12 at 14:04
1  
IMO it's probably not a wise thing to NOT have a timeout. There's always a likelihood your task is stuck / deadlocking and the user would wait forever. –  gerrytan Jan 28 at 2:10

Use a CountDownLatch:

CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(totalNumberOfTasks);
ExecutorService taskExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);
while(...) {
  taskExecutor.execute(new MyTask());
}

try {
  latch.await();
} catch (InterruptedException E) {
   // handle
}

and within your task (enclose in try / finally)

latch.countDown();
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2  
There aren't 4 tasks. There are "some number of tasks" done 4 at a time. –  cletus Aug 9 '09 at 4:55
    
Only instead of CountDownLatch(4) I need to use number of total threads created, right? –  serg Aug 9 '09 at 4:55
    
Sorry, I misunderstood the question. Yes, number of tasks should be the argument to CountDownLatch constructor –  ChssPly76 Aug 9 '09 at 4:56
2  
I find this solution more elegant than the others, it looks like it was made for this purpose, and it's simple and straightforward. –  wvdschel Aug 9 '09 at 8:00
5  
@cletus - then you don't use a CountDownLatch :-) Mind you, I'm not arguing that this approach is better than yours. However, I found that in real life scenarios I do know the number of tasks, thread pool settings do need to be configurable per deployment, and pools can be reused. So I usually have thread pools injected by Spring and setting them as prototypes and manually shutting them down only in order to wait for threads to finish seems less than ideal. –  ChssPly76 Aug 9 '09 at 16:15

ExecutorService.invokeAll() does it for you.

ExecutorService taskExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);
List<Callable<?>> tasks; // your tasks
// invokeAll() returns when all tasks are complete
List<Future<?>> futures = taskExecutor.invokeAll(tasks);
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The difficulty comes if/when you have the start the "4" threads one at a time, piece-wise, then join/let finish all 4... –  rogerdpack Nov 8 '12 at 22:44

You can use Lists of Futures, as well:

List<Futures> futures = new ArrayList<Future>();
// now add to it:
futures.add(executorInstance.submit(new Callable<Void>() {
  public Void call() throws IOException {
     // do something
    return null;
  }
}));

then when you want to join on all of them, its essentially the equivalent of joining on each, (with the added benefit that it re-raises exceptions from child threads to the main):

for(Future f: this.futures) { f.get(); }

Basically the trick is to call .get() on each Future one at a time, instead of infinite looping calling isDone() on (all or each).

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The CyclicBarrier class in Java 5 and later is designed for this sort of thing.

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2  
Cool, can never remember the name of this data structure. However, only suitable if you know beforehand the amount of tasks that will get queued. –  Peter V Jan 2 '12 at 8:16
    
yeah you'd think you'd be able to hit the barrier with the current thread, and all the child threads, then when you passed it you'd know the child threads were done... –  rogerdpack Nov 8 '12 at 22:45

You could wrap your tasks in another runnable, that will send notifications:

taskExecutor.execute(new Runnable() {
  public void run() {
    taskStartedNotification();
    new MyTask().run();
    taskFinishedNotification();
  }
});
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Just my two cents. To overcome the requirement of CountDownLatch to know the number of tasks beforehand, you could do it the old fashion way by using a simple Semaphore.

ExecutorService taskExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);
int numberOfTasks=0;
Semaphore s=new Semaphore(0);
while(...) {
    taskExecutor.execute(new MyTask());
    numberOfTasks++;
}

try {
    s.aquire(numberOfTasks);
...

In your task just call s.release() as you would latch.countDown();

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I've just written a sample program that solves your problem. There was no concise implementation given, so I'll add one. While you can use executor.shutdown() and executor.awaitTermination(), it is not the best practice as the time taken by different threads would be unpredictable.

ExecutorService es = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
    List<Callable<Integer>> tasks = new ArrayList<>();

    for (int j = 1; j <= 10; j++) {
        tasks.add(new Callable<Integer>() {

            @Override
            public Integer call() throws Exception {
                int sum = 0;
                System.out.println("Starting Thread "
                        + Thread.currentThread().getId());

                for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
                    sum += i;
                }

                System.out.println("Stopping Thread "
                        + Thread.currentThread().getId());
                return sum;
            }

        });
    }

    try {
        List<Future<Integer>> futures = es.invokeAll(tasks);
        int flag = 0;

        for (Future<Integer> f : futures) {
            Integer res = f.get();
            System.out.println("Sum: " + res);
            if (!f.isDone()) 
                flag = 1;
        }

        if (flag == 0)
            System.out.println("SUCCESS");
        else
            System.out.println("FAILED");

    } catch (InterruptedException | ExecutionException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
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You could use your own subclass of ExecutorCompletionService to wrap taskExecutor, and your own implementation of BlockingQueue to get informed when each task completes and perform whatever callback or other action you desire when the number of completed tasks reaches your desired goal.

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