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I need to execute some amount of tasks 4 at a time, something like this:

ExecutorService taskExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);
while(...) {
    taskExecutor.execute(new MyTask());
}
//...wait for completion somehow

How can I get notified once all of them are complete? For now I can't think about anything better than setting some global task counter and decrease it at the end of every task, then monitor in infinite loop this counter to become 0; or get a list of Futures and in infinite loop monitor isDone for all of them. What are better solutions not involving infinite loops?

Thanks.

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18 Answers 18

up vote 230 down vote accepted

Basically on an ExecutorService you call shutdown() and then awaitTermination():

ExecutorService taskExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);
while(...) {
  taskExecutor.execute(new MyTask());
}
taskExecutor.shutdown();
try {
  taskExecutor.awaitTermination(Long.MAX_VALUE, TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS);
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
3  
this is exactly what shutdown / awaitTermination are meant for – matt b Aug 9 '09 at 14:31
11  
It is a good pattern if this task handling is a one-time event. If this is done repeatedly during the same runtime, however, it is not optimal, as you would create and tear down threads repeatedly every time it is executed. – sjlee Aug 9 '09 at 16:25
24  
I'm looking for any official documentation that Long.MAX_VALUE, TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS is equivalent to not having a timeout. – Sam Harwell Aug 22 '12 at 14:04
2  
I can't believe that you have to use shutdown in order to join on all the current threads (after using shutdown, you cannot use the executor again ever). Suggest using list of Future's instead... – rogerdpack Nov 2 '12 at 16:02
3  
IMO it's probably not a wise thing to NOT have a timeout. There's always a likelihood your task is stuck / deadlocking and the user would wait forever. – gerrytan Jan 28 '14 at 2:10

Use a CountDownLatch:

CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(totalNumberOfTasks);
ExecutorService taskExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);
while(...) {
  taskExecutor.execute(new MyTask());
}

try {
  latch.await();
} catch (InterruptedException E) {
   // handle
}

and within your task (enclose in try / finally)

latch.countDown();
share|improve this answer
2  
There aren't 4 tasks. There are "some number of tasks" done 4 at a time. – cletus Aug 9 '09 at 4:55
1  
Sorry, I misunderstood the question. Yes, number of tasks should be the argument to CountDownLatch constructor – ChssPly76 Aug 9 '09 at 4:56
3  
I find this solution more elegant than the others, it looks like it was made for this purpose, and it's simple and straightforward. – wvdschel Aug 9 '09 at 8:00
1  
What if you don't know the number of tasks before you start? – cletus Aug 9 '09 at 10:26
6  
@cletus - then you don't use a CountDownLatch :-) Mind you, I'm not arguing that this approach is better than yours. However, I found that in real life scenarios I do know the number of tasks, thread pool settings do need to be configurable per deployment, and pools can be reused. So I usually have thread pools injected by Spring and setting them as prototypes and manually shutting them down only in order to wait for threads to finish seems less than ideal. – ChssPly76 Aug 9 '09 at 16:15

ExecutorService.invokeAll() does it for you.

ExecutorService taskExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);
List<Callable<?>> tasks; // your tasks
// invokeAll() returns when all tasks are complete
List<Future<?>> futures = taskExecutor.invokeAll(tasks);
share|improve this answer
    
The difficulty comes if/when you have the start the "4" threads one at a time, piece-wise, then join/let finish all 4... – rogerdpack Nov 8 '12 at 22:44
    
@rogerdpack: I am still learning this executors and stuff. But in response to what you ask. Should the 4 threads at a time not be part of a batch task which is executed using the answer above? – Mukul Goel Nov 20 '14 at 16:39
1  
@MukulGoel depends if you know before hand that you need 4 threads... – rogerdpack Nov 20 '14 at 19:39
3  
This method will only work if you know the number of tasks before hand. – Konstantin Jan 26 '15 at 12:37
    
this should be the correct answer! – Guillaume Jun 21 at 12:44

You can use Lists of Futures, as well:

List<Future> futures = new ArrayList<Future>();
// now add to it:
futures.add(executorInstance.submit(new Callable<Void>() {
  public Void call() throws IOException {
     // do something
    return null;
  }
}));

then when you want to join on all of them, its essentially the equivalent of joining on each, (with the added benefit that it re-raises exceptions from child threads to the main):

for(Future f: this.futures) { f.get(); }

Basically the trick is to call .get() on each Future one at a time, instead of infinite looping calling isDone() on (all or each). So you're guaranteed to "move on" through and past this block as soon as the last thread finishes. The caveat is that since the .get() call re-raises exceptions, if one of the threads dies, you would raise from this possibly before the other threads have finished to completion [to avoid this, you could add a catch ExecutionException around the get call]. The other caveat is it keeps a reference to all threads so if they have thread local variables they won't get collected till after you get past this block (though you might be able to get around this, if it became a problem, by removing Future's off the ArrayList). If you wanted to know which Future "finishes first" you could use some something like http://stackoverflow.com/a/31885029/32453

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1  
To know which "finishes first", use ExecutorCompletionService.take: stackoverflow.com/a/11872604/199364 – ToolmakerSteve Sep 6 '15 at 8:57

Just my two cents. To overcome the requirement of CountDownLatch to know the number of tasks beforehand, you could do it the old fashion way by using a simple Semaphore.

ExecutorService taskExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);
int numberOfTasks=0;
Semaphore s=new Semaphore(0);
while(...) {
    taskExecutor.execute(new MyTask());
    numberOfTasks++;
}

try {
    s.aquire(numberOfTasks);
...

In your task just call s.release() as you would latch.countDown();

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2  
Exactly what I was needed. nice simple solution! – Roee Gavirel Nov 20 '14 at 19:03
    
On seeing this, I first wondered if it would be a problem if some release calls happen before the acquire call, but after reading Semaphore documentation, I see that is okay. – ToolmakerSteve Sep 6 '15 at 9:27

The CyclicBarrier class in Java 5 and later is designed for this sort of thing.

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4  
Cool, can never remember the name of this data structure. However, only suitable if you know beforehand the amount of tasks that will get queued. – Pete V. Jan 2 '12 at 8:16
    
yeah you'd think you'd be able to hit the barrier with the current thread, and all the child threads, then when you passed it you'd know the child threads were done... – rogerdpack Nov 8 '12 at 22:45

A bit late to the game but for the sake of completion...

Instead of 'waiting' for all tasks to finish, you can think in terms of the Hollywood principle, "don't call me, I'll call you" - when I'm finished. I think the resulting code is more elegant...

Guava offers some interesting tools to accomplish this.

An example ::

Wrap an ExecutorService into a ListeningExecutorService ::

ListeningExecutorService service = MoreExecutors.listeningDecorator(Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10));

Submit a collection of callables for execution ::

for (Callable<Integer> callable : callables) {
  ListenableFuture<Integer> lf = service.submit(callable);
  // listenableFutures is a collection
  listenableFutures.add(lf)
});

Now the essential part:

ListenableFuture<List<Integer>> lf = Futures.successfulAsList(listenableFutures);

Attach a callback to the ListenableFuture, that you can use to be notified when all futures complete ::

        Futures.addCallback(lf, new FutureCallback<List<Integer>>() {
        @Override
        public void onSuccess(List<Integer> result) {
            log.info("@@ finished processing {} elements", Iterables.size(result));
            // do something with all the results
        }

        @Override
        public void onFailure(Throwable t) {
            log.info("@@ failed because of :: {}", t);
        }
    });

This also offers the advantage that you can collect all the results in one place once the processing is finished...

More information here

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You could wrap your tasks in another runnable, that will send notifications:

taskExecutor.execute(new Runnable() {
  public void run() {
    taskStartedNotification();
    new MyTask().run();
    taskFinishedNotification();
  }
});
share|improve this answer
1  
Took me awhile to see how this would solve OP's question. First, note that this wrapping is of each task, not of the code that starts all the tasks. Presumably, each start would increment a counter, and each finish would decrement that counter, or would increment a completed counter. So after starting them all, at each notification, could determine whether all tasks have completed. Note that it is vital to use try/finally so that a finished notification (or an alternative notification in catch block) is given even if a task fails. Otherwise, would wait forever. – ToolmakerSteve Sep 6 '15 at 9:12

I've just written a sample program that solves your problem. There was no concise implementation given, so I'll add one. While you can use executor.shutdown() and executor.awaitTermination(), it is not the best practice as the time taken by different threads would be unpredictable.

ExecutorService es = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
    List<Callable<Integer>> tasks = new ArrayList<>();

    for (int j = 1; j <= 10; j++) {
        tasks.add(new Callable<Integer>() {

            @Override
            public Integer call() throws Exception {
                int sum = 0;
                System.out.println("Starting Thread "
                        + Thread.currentThread().getId());

                for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
                    sum += i;
                }

                System.out.println("Stopping Thread "
                        + Thread.currentThread().getId());
                return sum;
            }

        });
    }

    try {
        List<Future<Integer>> futures = es.invokeAll(tasks);
        int flag = 0;

        for (Future<Integer> f : futures) {
            Integer res = f.get();
            System.out.println("Sum: " + res);
            if (!f.isDone()) 
                flag = 1;
        }

        if (flag == 0)
            System.out.println("SUCCESS");
        else
            System.out.println("FAILED");

    } catch (InterruptedException | ExecutionException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
It is good that you show use of future.get -- good alternative to know about. But why do you consider it better to wait forever, than to set some maximum acceptable timeout? More importantly, there is no reason to do all this logic, when one can simply give a really, really long time to awaitTermination, if you want to wait (essentially forever) until all tasks complete. – ToolmakerSteve Sep 6 '15 at 9:20

Just to provide more alternatives here different to use latch/barriers. You can also get the partial results until all of them finish using CompletionService.

From Java Concurrency in practice: "If you have a batch of computations to submit to an Executor and you want to retrieve their results as they become available, you could retain the Future associated with each task and repeatedly poll for completion by calling get with a timeout of zero. This is possible, but tedious. Fortunately there is a better way: a completion service."

Here the implementation

public class TaskSubmiter {
    private final ExecutorService executor;
    TaskSubmiter(ExecutorService executor) { this.executor = executor; }
    void doSomethingLarge(AnySourceClass source) {
        final List<InterestedResult> info = doPartialAsyncProcess(source);
        CompletionService<PartialResult> completionService = new ExecutorCompletionService<PartialResult>(executor);
        for (final InterestedResult interestedResultItem : info)
            completionService.submit(new Callable<PartialResult>() {
                public PartialResult call() {
                    return InterestedResult.doAnOperationToGetPartialResult();
                }
        });

    try {
        for (int t = 0, n = info.size(); t < n; t++) {
            Future<PartialResult> f = completionService.take();
            PartialResult PartialResult = f.get();
            processThisSegment(PartialResult);
            }
        } 
        catch (InterruptedException e) {
            Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
        } 
        catch (ExecutionException e) {
            throw somethinghrowable(e.getCause());
        }
    }
}
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In Java8 you can do it with CompletableFuture:

ExecutorService es = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);
List<Runnable> tasks = getTasks();
CompletableFuture[] all = tasks.stream()
                               .map(r -> runAsync(r, es))
                               .toArray(CompletableFuture[]::new);
CompletableFuture.allOf(all).join();    
es.shutdown();
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You could use your own subclass of ExecutorCompletionService to wrap taskExecutor, and your own implementation of BlockingQueue to get informed when each task completes and perform whatever callback or other action you desire when the number of completed tasks reaches your desired goal.

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Follow one of below approaches.

  1. Iterate through all Future tasks from submit on ExecutorService and check the status with blocking call get() on Future object as suggested by Kiran
  2. Use invokeAll() on ExecutorService, CountDownLatch, ForkJoinPool or Executors.newWorkStealingPool

  3. Shutdown the pool as recommended in oracle documentation page

    void shutdownAndAwaitTermination(ExecutorService pool) {
       pool.shutdown(); // Disable new tasks from being submitted
       try {
       // Wait a while for existing tasks to terminate
       if (!pool.awaitTermination(60, TimeUnit.SECONDS)) {
           pool.shutdownNow(); // Cancel currently executing tasks
           // Wait a while for tasks to respond to being cancelled
           if (!pool.awaitTermination(60, TimeUnit.SECONDS))
           System.err.println("Pool did not terminate");
       }
    } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
         // (Re-)Cancel if current thread also interrupted
         pool.shutdownNow();
         // Preserve interrupt status
         Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
    }
    

If you want to gracefully wait for all tasks for completion when you are not using one of invokeAll() on ExecutorService, CountDownLatch, ForkJoinPool or Executors.newWorkStealingPool, change

if (!pool.awaitTermination(60, TimeUnit.SECONDS)) {

to

a while(condition) which checks for every 1 minute.

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You could call waitTillDone() on this Runner class:

Runner runner = Runner.runner(4); // create pool with 4 threads in thread pool

while(...) {
    runner.run(new MyTask()); // here you submit your task
}


runner.waitTillDone(); // and this blocks until all tasks are finished (or failed)


runner.shutdown(); // once you done you can shutdown the runner

You can reuse this class and call waitTillDone() as many times as you want to before calling shutdown(), plus your code is extremly simple. Also you don't have to know the number of tasks upfront.

the source code for this class can be found here: http://matejtymes.blogspot.com/2016/04/executor-that-notifies-you-when-task.html

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you should use executorService.shutdown() and executorService.awaitTermination method.

An example as follows :

public class ScheduledThreadPoolExample {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        ScheduledExecutorService executorService = Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(5);
        executorService.scheduleAtFixedRate(() -> System.out.println("process task."),
                0, 1, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

        TimeUnit.SECONDS.sleep(10);
        executorService.shutdown();
        executorService.awaitTermination(1, TimeUnit.DAYS);
    }

}
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Java 8 - We can use stream API to process stream. Please see snippet below

final List<Runnable> tasks = ...; //or any other functional interface
tasks.stream().parallel().forEach(Runnable::run) // Uses default pool

//alternatively to specify parallelism 
new ForkJoinPool(15).submit(
          () -> tasks.stream().parallel().forEach(Runnable::run) 
    ).get();
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1  
Hi Vlad, welcome to StackOverflow. Can you please edit your answer to explain how this answers the question, and what the code does? Code only answers are discouraged here. Thank you! – Tim Malone Jul 19 at 23:36

This might help

Log.i(LOG_TAG, "shutting down executor...");
executor.shutdown();
while (true) {
                try {
                    Log.i(LOG_TAG, "Waiting for executor to terminate...");
                    if (executor.isTerminated())
                        break;
                    if (executor.awaitTermination(5000, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS)) {
                        break;
                    }
                } catch (InterruptedException ignored) {}
            }
share|improve this answer

There is a method in executor getActiveCount() - that gives the count of active threads.

After spanning the thread, we can check if the activeCount() value is 0. Once the value is zero, it is meant that there are no active threads currently running which means task is finished:

while (true) {
    if (executor.getActiveCount() == 0) {
    //ur own piece of code
    break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Not a good idea, see stackoverflow.com/a/7271685/1166992 and the javadoc: "Returns the approximate number of threads that are actively executing tasks." – Olivier Faucheux Apr 24 '15 at 7:24

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