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I have some problems using argparse. I want to have a set of names I can define on the command line which will influence the program's behaviour. I tried the following snippet:

import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument("allon", action='store_true', default = False,
                    help="Toggles all output pins to ON.")
parser.add_argument("alloff",action='store_true',
                    help="Toggles all output pins to OFF.")
parser.add_argument("cont", action='store_true',
                    help="Toggles all output pins continously on and off.")
args = parser.parse_args()

if args.allon:
   do_allon()
elif args.alloff:
    do_alloff()
....

but the code's behavious is anything than expected. I do not want to use the '--' for those options, as I want to call my code like git status (without the leading '--').

First, if I call the code without arguments all the arguments are set to True, while I want them to be set to False if they are not given. The expected behaviour is as follows: When calling as

python code.py

I want allon, alloff and cont to be set to False, while when calling as

python code.py alloff

I want allon and cont to be False while alloff set to be True.

Second, when I call e.g. python code.py allon I get

code.py: error: unrecognized arguments: allon

which I don't understand at all. I know how to use optparse, but help with argparse is greatly appreciated to get the above snippet working.

Thanks Alex

P.S. The if-loop is just educational, not actually implemented that way.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you see a command pattern like git status, git commit, etc. we are talking about sub-commands. To create sub-commands, argparse lets you use sub-parsers, which are essentially just like the main parser (take command-line switches, etc.).

Define them like this:

import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
subparsers = parser.add_subparsers(help='sub-command help')

allon_parser = subparsers.add_parser('allon',
    help='Toggles all output pins to ON.')
allon_parser.set_defaults(func=do_allon)

alloff_parser = subparsers.add_parser('alloff',
    help="Toggles all output pins to OFF.")
alloff_parser.set_defaults(func=do_alloff)

cont_parser = subparsers.add_parser('cont',
    help="Toggles all output pins continously on and off.")
cont_parser.set_defaults(func=do_cont)

args = parser.parse_args()
# Call the associated `func` function
args.func()

I've associated a function with each subparser (set_defaults(func=...)), and thus the args structure will have a func attribute pointing to one of the functions defined. We simply have to call it.

Output of --help:

usage: PROG [-h] {cont,alloff,allon} ...

positional arguments:
  {cont,alloff,allon}  sub-command help
    allon              Toggles all output pins to ON.
    alloff             Toggles all output pins to OFF.
    cont               Toggles all output pins continously on and off.

optional arguments:
  -h, --help           show this help message and exit
share|improve this answer
    
It looks like this is what I needed. Thanks. –  Alex Sep 20 '12 at 8:32

Options are normally specified using a leading - for short arguments (1 character) or a leading -- for long arguments.

Therefore, you should give your optional arguments two leading dashes:

import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
# Note that `default=False` is unnecessary since it's implied by `store_true`.
parser.add_argument("--allon", action='store_true',
                    help="Toggles all output pins to ON.")
parser.add_argument("--alloff",action='store_true',
                    help="Toggles all output pins to OFF.")
parser.add_argument("--cont", action='store_true',
                    help="Toggles all output pins continously on and off.")
args = parser.parse_args()

if args.allon:
    do_allon()
elif args.alloff:
    do_alloff()
....
share|improve this answer
    
I know, but I wanted to implement this how other commands are handled, for example git commands. You call git status and not git --status. –  Alex Sep 20 '12 at 6:51
1  
Git "commands" are actually subcommands -- git X basically delegates to a command called git-X. Each subcommand takes options as usual, e.g. git add -p. I would not consider an option called "allon" to be a subcommand, for example. –  nneonneo Sep 20 '12 at 6:52
1  
@Alex: That's not comparable. The subcommand status isn't an optional flag like your arguments are- it's a positional argument. It is always necessary, and there is always exactly one of them. (You could implement it with parser.add_argument('subcommand'), and it would exit with the usage message if it were ignored, just like git does). On the other hand, you do use git status --ignore-submodules... –  David Robinson Sep 20 '12 at 6:54
    
@Alex: Actually, as I mention in my edit, if you want to use subcommands like git does you should use the add_subparser functionality, which lets you break up the command line parsing based on the first argument. –  David Robinson Sep 20 '12 at 7:11
    
@Alex: In this case I think you just want a choices-limited mandatory first argument; see my other answer. –  nneonneo Sep 20 '12 at 7:11

If you want to make the first argument to your function mandatory, and limit the choices available, do it this way:

import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()

parser.add_argument("action", action="store", choices=['allon', 'alloff', 'cont'])

args = parser.parse_args()

if args.action == 'allon':
    print 'allon'
elif args.action == 'alloff':
    print 'alloff'

Example usage:

$ python req_argparse.py allon
allon
$ python req_argparse.py alloff
alloff
$ python req_argparse.py nope
usage: req_argparse.py [-h] {allon,alloff,cont}
req_argparse.py: error: argument action: invalid choice: 'nope' (choose from 'allon', 'alloff', 'cont')
share|improve this answer

When options in argparse are optional flags, they should start with -- like so:

import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument("--allon", action='store_true', default = False,
                    help="Toggles all output pins to ON.")
parser.add_argument("--alloff",action='store_true',
                    help="Toggles all output pins to OFF.")
parser.add_argument("--cont", action='store_true',
                    help="Toggles all output pins continously on and off.")
args = parser.parse_args()

if we then add the code:

print args.allon, args.alloff, args.cont

we can demonstrate that your program will have the desired behavior:

$ python test.py
False False False
$ python test.py --allon
True False False
$ python test.py --alloff
False True False
$ python test.py --cont
False False True
$ python test.py --allon --alloff --cont
True True True

ETA: If you want to have a subcommand equivalent to git's status, add, commit, etc, then optional flags would not be the right way to implement it. You should instead use argparse's add_subparsers functionality.

share|improve this answer
    
I do not want the leading '--', see edited main question. –  Alex Sep 20 '12 at 6:52
    
@Alex: Did you see my and nneonneo's comments? –  David Robinson Sep 20 '12 at 6:57

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