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In which files do we need to make changes in order to add a new controller in Module and call it through URL.

Is there a way in which we add a new controller file and call it through url without changing any other configuration files.

As it will be very tedious to make changes in configuration files on every add or edit in controller files.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To create a new controller, you have at least to

  • create the controller class
  • make sure you've got a matching route that satisfies your purpose (you can take existing ones as well as create a new one for special purposes)
  • create a controllers.invokables entry in your module's module.config.php.

There's no way around these three simple steps. I don't see why it should be a problem to adapt the module.config.php when you add a controller -- that's what config files are for. Including opening, saving und closing, this takes approx. 10-15 seconds. You aren't going to create hundreds of controllers, are you?

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6  
zf1 wasnt newbei ready, zf2 even more difficult :))) –  SMka Sep 20 '12 at 7:31
    
I wouldn't say that. I haven't used ZF1 but ZF2 has so many nice aspects that ZF1 doesn't have (according to other peoples' opinion). –  Daniel M Sep 20 '12 at 7:33
    
working with zf1 over five years. zf2 - a really, really good :) –  SMka Sep 20 '12 at 7:40
    
As long as you're familiar with OOP and MVC, ZF2 is more user-friendly than ZF1 ever was. As long as you're only looking at modules and the setup. It takes quite some understanding of how the configuration is done, but that's what webinars and the documentation are there for :) –  Sam Sep 20 '12 at 12:23
1  
I've been using ZF1 for a few years now, and ZF2 is better in many ways. Zend Framework is made with a focus on Enterprise systems. There is an inverse relationship between flexibility and simplicity. If you want something newbie friendly and easy to learn, check out Ruby on Rails. However if you will be making a massive web system used by more than 2,000+ people daily, Zend Framework has got you covered. –  Apollo Clark Apr 10 '13 at 17:29

I am adding a little clarification to what Daniel said on "make sure you've got a matching route that satisfies your purpose...". For my purpose I was trying to accommodate routes to module/Application/src/Application/Controller/IndexController.php and module/Application/src/Application/Controller/ProfileController.php, however I struggled to resolve anything to my ProfileController. It was also not clear if ZF2 could accommodate multiple Controllers in a single module. I thought surely it must and it does! Given the two above controllers this is how I crafted my 'router' array inside module/Application/config/module.config.php.

'router' => array(
    'routes' => array(
        'home' => array(
            'type' => 'Zend\Mvc\Router\Http\Literal',
            'options' => array(
                'route'    => '/',
                'defaults' => array(
                    'controller' => 'Application\Controller\Index',
                    'action'     => 'index',
                ),
            ),
        ),
        'application' => array(
            'type'    => 'Literal',
            'options' => array(
                'route'    => '/application',
                'defaults' => array(
                    '__NAMESPACE__' => 'Application\Controller',
                    'controller'    => 'Index',
                    'action'        => 'index',
                ),
            ),
            'may_terminate' => true,
            'child_routes' => array(
                'default' => array(
                    'type'    => 'Segment',
                    'options' => array(
                        'route'    => '/[:controller[/:action]]',
                        'constraints' => array(
                            'controller' => '[a-zA-Z][a-zA-Z0-9_-]*',
                            'action'     => '[a-zA-Z][a-zA-Z0-9_-]*',
                        ),
                        'defaults' => array(
                        ),
                    ),
                ),
            ),
        ),

        'profile' => array(
            'type' => 'literal',
            'options' => array(
                'route' => '/profile',
                'defaults' => array(
                    '__NAMESPACE__' => 'Application\Controller',
                    'controller'    => 'Profile',
                    'action'        => 'index',
                ),
            ),
        ),
    ),
),

Also this is what my 'controllers' invokables looks like in modules.config.php following success.

'controllers' => array(
    'invokables' => array(
        'Application\Controller\Index' => 'Application\Controller\IndexController',
        'Application\Controller\Profile' => 'Application\Controller\ProfileController'
    ),
),
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2  
Zend 2 is really not that workable... I shouldn't have to go through hoops like that to add a controller. Just my opinion. –  aserwin Mar 16 '13 at 22:36
    
@user1815615, perfect explanation :) +1 –  Sagar Panchal Feb 25 at 4:40

From Zend Framework 2 reference

We inform the application about controllers we expect to have in the application. This is to prevent somebody requesting any service the ServiceManager knows about in an attempt to break the application. The dispatcher uses a special, scoped container that will only pull controllers that are specifically registered with it, either as invokable classes or via factories.

src : http://framework.zend.com/manual/2.0/en/modules/zend.mvc.quick-start.html#create-a-route

Adding the controllers is not related to routing, except tangentially due to developers wanting to be able to specify the controller in the URL. It's a security issue, due to the fact that we treat controllers as services.

This is an effort (a) to be explicit about what controllers are available, and (b) to be secure by default.

As sayed by Matthew Weier O'Phinney .

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