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I have the following code:

    public class AppDomainArgs : MarshalByRefObject {
        public string myString;
    }

    static AppDomainArgs ada = new AppDomainArgs() { myString = "abc" };

    static void Main(string[] args) {
        AppDomain domain = AppDomain.CreateDomain("Domain666");
        domain.DoCallBack(MyNewAppDomainMethod);
        Console.WriteLine(ada.myString);
        Console.ReadKey();
        AppDomain.Unload(domain);
    }

    static void MyNewAppDomainMethod() {
        ada.myString = "working!";
    }

I thought make this would make my ada.myString have "working!" on the main appdomain, but it doesn't. I thought that by inhering from MarshalByRefObject any changes made on the 2nd appdomain would reflect also in the original one(I thought this would be just a proxy to the real object on the main appdomain!)?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
(added a bit of explanation as a comment) – Marc Gravell Aug 9 '09 at 7:30
up vote 14 down vote accepted

The problem in your code is that you never actually pass the object over the boundary; thus you have two ada instances, one in each app-domain (the static field initializer runs on both app-domains). You will need to pass the instance over the boundary for the MarshalByRefObject magic to kick in.

For example:

using System;
class MyBoundaryObject : MarshalByRefObject {
    public void SomeMethod(AppDomainArgs ada) {
        Console.WriteLine(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName + "; executing");
        ada.myString = "working!";
    }
}
public class AppDomainArgs : MarshalByRefObject {
    public string myString { get; set; }
}
static class Program {
     static void Main() {
         AppDomain domain = AppDomain.CreateDomain("Domain666");
         MyBoundaryObject boundary = (MyBoundaryObject)
              domain.CreateInstanceAndUnwrap(
                 typeof(MyBoundaryObject).Assembly.FullName,
                 typeof(MyBoundaryObject).FullName);

         AppDomainArgs ada = new AppDomainArgs();
         ada.myString = "abc";
         Console.WriteLine("Before: " + ada.myString);
         boundary.SomeMethod(ada);
         Console.WriteLine("After: " + ada.myString);         
         Console.ReadKey();
         AppDomain.Unload(domain);
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
How would be that? :o – devoured elysium Aug 9 '09 at 7:01
2  
I don't understand "How would be that?", but if you want an example; added. – Marc Gravell Aug 9 '09 at 7:06
    
I just run your code and it does what i am looking for! Thanks! Now I'll look at it carefully to understand what's happing in there. – devoured elysium Aug 9 '09 at 7:17
2  
The important points; I need a method (SomeMethod) that passes an instance of AppDomainArgs over the boundary; this method must itself be on a MarshalByRefObject, and we want the MyBoundaryObject object to be in the other app-domain (CreateInstanceAndUnwrap). – Marc Gravell Aug 9 '09 at 7:22
2  
Simply; instance fields are scoped by the instance; static fields are scoped by the AppDomain. Your references to ada are actually "ada in the current app-domain" - which is different for the code in Main (executing on the primary app-domain) and MyNewAppDomainMethod (executing in "Domain666"). Re books - I don't know, sorry. – Marc Gravell Aug 9 '09 at 7:38

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