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I've struggled some time now. I just started with xslt, and I got things working just fine. Templates are used wherever possible and I've tried to keep myself from using for-loops.

My problem is this: I have a number of nodes with similar names, only difference is a postfix number from 1 to (currently) 5. These should all be transformed into a node without the numbers. So basically, here is what I have:

<title1>some title</title1>
<some_other_nodes>....</some_other_nodes>
<title2>some title2</title2>
.
.
.
<title5>....</title5>

And this is what I want:

<title>some title</title>
.
.
.
<title>some title2</title>
.
.
.
<title>....</title>

Is it possible to do substring matching with templates (matching just the title-part)?

Thanks for your help!

share|improve this question
    
Are you using XSLT1.0 or XSLT2.0? Also, will the number always be at end, or can you get elements with the number in the middle, such as title1extra? –  Tim C Sep 20 '12 at 7:50
    
XSLT2.0 and numbers are always at the end. –  Juicef Sep 20 '12 at 8:45
    
@Juicef, Now you have a true XSLT 2.0 solution that works even in the most complex cases -- in which the currently accepted answer fails to produce the wanted result. –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 20 '12 at 12:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For elements of the form titleN, where N is some number, use a match condition like ...

(corrected:)

<xsl:template match="*[starts-with(name(),'title')]
                      [number(substring(name(),6))=number(substring(name(),6))]">
  etc...

Less generically, but quick and dirty, if you want SPECIFICALLY title1 through to title5, you might also think about ...

<xsl:template match="title1|title2|title3|title4|title5">
share|improve this answer
    
Almost Perfect! A slight modification to your first solution and all worked out really nicely. In case someone else stumbles upon this problem, the modification fixing it for me was changing "name" to "match". Thank you! –  Juicef Sep 20 '12 at 9:04
    
Yes. name attribute was an error. It should be match. I will update accordingly. Dimitre's match() solution is better if you have XSLT 2.0 . I wrote my answer before you posted the comment saying XSLT 2.0, and just assumed XSLT 1.0 . Also note the regex will work just as well without the reluctant qualifier in the match condition, although it is still needed in the xsl:element name AVT. –  Sean B. Durkin Sep 20 '12 at 14:29

Here is a true XSLT 2.0 solution that covers even the most complex cases, not covered by other answers:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"   xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="*[matches(name(), '^title.*?\d+$')]">
  <xsl:element name="{replace(name(), '^(title.*?)\d+$', '$1')}">
    <xsl:copy-of select="namespace::*"/>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:element>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the following XML document:

<t>
    <title1>some title</title1>
    <some_other_nodes>....</some_other_nodes>
    <title2>some title2</title2> . . . 
    <title5>....</title5>
    <titleX253>Complex title</titleX253>
</t>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<t>
      <title>some title</title>
      <some_other_nodes>....</some_other_nodes>
      <title>some title2</title> . . . 
    <title>....</title>
      <titleX>Complex title</titleX>
</t>

Do note the element:

<titleX253>Complex title</titleX253>

It should be transformed into:

<titleX>Complex title</titleX>

This is not what the answer by Sean Durkin does !

share|improve this answer
    
Ah! So regexpes are now completely integrated (without extensions)? Tried to find information about that without any concrete examples. Nice to know! Thank you! –  Juicef Sep 21 '12 at 8:51
    
@Juicef, Yes In XPath 2.0 there are these three functions that work with RegExes: tokenize(), matches() and replace(). In addition to this, XSLT 2.0 has the instructions <xsl:analyze-string>, <xsl:matching-substring> and <xsl:non-matching-substring>. The functions are specified here: w3.org/TR/xpath-functions/#string.match and the instructions are specified here: w3.org/TR/2007/REC-xslt20-20070123/#regular-expressions . Every standard XPath 2.0 implementation (including every compliant XSLT 2.0 processor) implements these. –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 21 '12 at 11:29
    
Thanks for the links! –  Juicef Sep 27 '12 at 11:13

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