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I have input strings that look something like these

inspect [foo - bar] with [errors - 15] 
create [doodle]
force delete [quux]

That is, lines which contain information within square brackets.

What I want is to take one of those lines at a time and get an array like

["inspect", "[foo - bar], "with", "[errors - 15]"]

Using a regular expression it's easy to collect the bracketed expressions and the parts between the bracketed expressions separately:

var src = "inspect [foo - bar] with [errors - 15]"
var regexBracketed = /\[[a-zA-Z0-9_\- ]+\]/g;

// this returns an array of the bracketed expressions
console.log(src.match(regexBracketed));

// and this returns an array of the parts between the expressions
console.log(src.split(regexBracketed));

Is there a simple way to get everything in just one array? Maybe I'm attacking this entirely the wrong way.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

are you referring to groups (capturing parentheses)? /(.*)/ ?

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Guide/Regular_Expressions#Using_Parenthesized_Substring_Matches

for example, if you want to capture the strings in the brackets, then you can use this:

var r=/^\s*[^\[\]]*\[([^\[\]]+)\](?:[^\[\]]*\[([^\[\]]*)\])?\s*$/;
var m = "inspect [foo - bar] with [errors - 15] ".match(r);
console.log(m[1], m[2]);

you can add \s* to the expression to trim whitespace too.

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You know, I believe I am. Accepted. –  PapaFreud Sep 20 '12 at 7:55

Here's the way I did it, plus a jsFiddle.

var src = "inspect [foo - bar] with [errors - 15] " +
          "create [doodle] " +
          "force delete [quux]";

var regex = /[^\[]+|[^\]]+\]/g;

document.write(src.match(regex));​

Outputs:

inspect ,[foo - bar], with ,[errors - 15], create ,[doodle], force delete ,[quux]

And I trust you know how to trim whitespace as you please :)

To explain the regex, which admittedly looks a bit cryptic, it's simply saying, "Get me all the characters up to a [, or, if you're already at a [, then get me all the characters up to ], plus that ] please!."

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@akonsu is right, it's just a matter of adding parentheses, like this:

var src = "inspect [foo - bar] with [errors - 15]";
var regexCapturing = /(\[[a-zA-Z0-9_\- ]+\])/;
console.log(src.split(regexCapturing));

It outputs

 ["inspect ", "[foo - bar]", " with ", "[errors - 15]", ""] 

Some whitespace trimming and skipping over that last empty string and I'm all set. Thanks.

(I'm just writing this as an answer because I can't use code formatting in comments.)

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I have added a regex to my answer that allows you to avoid cleaning up the resulting array. –  akonsu Sep 20 '12 at 10:48

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