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I've just started a new project and I am confronted with a production application Oracle 10g database that has just 3 foreign key constraints. I am not used to seeing databases with no foreign key constraints. I am guessing that there may be some performance/concurrency considerations to not using FKs. The reason is that in the logical database schema the architect has specified all the relationships, but these relationships are not implemented in the database as Foreign Key constraints.

Question: I read that I can define a Foreign Key Constraint with RELY NOVALIDATE that will not impact performance. Is it worth while to define RELY FK constraints on this database just so that the relationship can be easily seen? this application is not built using ORM, is it really worth while to do without foreign keys?

The database is denormalised with example below

Table 1 : FINProduct(ID (number), Description(varchar(5)), FINproductCode(varchar(10))...)

Table 2: FINProductCode(ID (number, FINproductCode(varchar(10)) , LastUpdated(datetime)...)

So instead of having a relationship between Tables 1 and 2 the FINproductCode column is just replicated in table 1.

It's too early to drink but I think i need one!

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There are not performance penalties related to FK. Or in other words they are so small that and gained data integrity is MUCH more valuable. So if possible try to add FKs. In the process you could discover that some data point to non-existing parent rows. And that would need to be fixed. It is possible data DB was ported from MySQL that in one of the engines doesn't support FKs. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/ansi-diff-foreign-keys.html "For storage engines other than InnoDB, MySQL Server parses the FOREIGN KEY syntax in CREATE TABLE statements, but does not use or store it." –  Petar Repac Sep 20 '12 at 7:53
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There are certain situations where the performance penalties of FK are not worth it - mostly in data warehousing environments, where you ensure data integrity by completely controlling the load process. In an OLTP database, however, you should indeed add a "physical" FK constraint for every "logical" FK relationship. –  Frank Schmitt Sep 20 '12 at 8:02
    
@Frank Schmitt: yes, you are right. When doing mass amount of INSERTS and UPDATES FKs could make performance issues. –  Petar Repac Sep 20 '12 at 8:06
    
This app as I understand it is an OLTP database not a Data Mart/Warehouse. After I recovered from my shock I have realised this databasei s heavily denormalised, hence the lack of FKs. Is it really useful to have denormalisation to such a degree for an OLTP type application? This OLTP is basically for financial transactions –  alwayshungry Sep 21 '12 at 0:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would be very wary about assuming that the absence of foreign key constraints was a reasoned response to performance issues. There is an overhead to enforcing a foreign key constraint (particularly where appropriate indexes are missing) but it is incredibly unlikely that your application can validate the constraint more efficiently than Oracle can. So the question really is whether you want the small overhead of foreign key constraints or the near certainty that you will get invalid data inserted into the database. It would be extremely unlikely that this is a trade-off that you want to make-- I've yet to meet a business user that would be happy to capture incorrect and incomprehensible data even if doing so was a bit faster than capturing correct data.

Unless there is substantially more background, I would tend to create all the missing foreign key constraints. Creating RELY NOVALIDATE constraints is possible but it defeats the major benefit of foreign key constraints-- preventing invalid data from entering the database in the first place.

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There is a corollary to this. If the FK constraints were on the tables where data was entered into the database and the tables without FKs were solely constructed by code; then if that has been done correctly there might not be a need to have a FK as the data is known to exist. This is obviously only true where data never gets deleted. –  Ben Sep 20 '12 at 8:17
    
This app as I understand it is an OLTP database not a Data Mart/Warehouse. After I recovered from my shock I have realised this databasei s heavily denormalised, hence the lack of FKs. Is it really useful to have denormalisation to such a degree for an OLTP type application? This OLTP is basically for financial transactions –  alwayshungry Sep 21 '12 at 0:24
    
@alwayshungry - No. If you're recording financial transactions, you really, really want the transactions to be recorded correctly. If you denormalize the data, you all but guarantee that transactions will be recorded incorrectly because no one is going to correctly update history every time a denormalized attribute changes. If the system lacks foreign keys, you all but guarantee that you're going to have orphaned and invalid rows. –  Justin Cave Sep 21 '12 at 2:55
    
FKs can also have a positive impact on performance. Is some cases they help Oracle generate effective execution plan. When having NO FKs you can face problems with execution plan stability. –  ibre5041 Nov 14 '13 at 11:03

It depends on whether you want to add the FK only for documentation purposes or whether you want to prevent future INSERTs/UPDATEs with an invalid FK value.

If you want it only for documentation purposes, I'd create the FK constraint with RELY NOVALIDATE and DISABLE it afterwards - otherwise, Oracle will check it for future INSERTs / UPDATEs.

However: DON'T DO THIS UNLESS YOU ABSOLUTELY NEED IT!

I agree with Justin Cave: In most cases, you should just add "plain" FK constraints - this way, you can ensure that your existing data is correct.

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I would try to create the constraints and report violations into a exception table. Fix the data and enable the constraint.

Create some test data

create table parent (pk integer
                    ,data varchar2(1)
                    ,CONSTRAINT PARENT_PK PRIMARY KEY (PK)  ENABLE );

create table child (pk integer
                    ,pk_parent integer
                    ,data varchar2(1)
                    ,CONSTRAINT CHILD_PK PRIMARY KEY (PK)  ENABLE );

insert into parent values (1,'a');
insert into parent values (2,'b');


insert into child values (1,1,'a');
insert into child values (2,2,'b');
insert into child values (3,3,'c');

Create a foreign key constraint:

alter table child add constraint fk_parent foreign key(pk_parent) references parent(pk);

SQL Error: ORA-02298: Kan (ROB.FK_PARENT) niet valideren - bovenliggende sleutels zijn niet gevonden.
02298. 00000 - "cannot validate (%s.%s) - parent keys not found"
*Cause:    an alter table validating constraint failed because the table has
           child records.
*Action:   Obvious

Create the foreign key with 'enable novalidate' option

alter table child add constraint fk_parent foreign key(pk_parent) references parent(pk) enable novalidate;
table CHILD altered.

insert into child values (4,4,'c');

SQL Error: ORA-02291: Integriteitsbeperking (ROB.FK_PARENT) is geschonden - bovenliggende sleutel is niet gevonden.
02291. 00000 - "integrity constraint (%s.%s) violated - parent key not found"
*Cause:    A foreign key value has no matching primary key value.
*Action:   Delete the foreign key or add a matching primary key.

No new data violating the FK can be inserted.

Now let's fix the data already in the table that violates the FK constraint

Create an exceptions table and try to enable the constraint:

create table exceptions(row_id rowid,
                        owner varchar2(30),
                        table_name varchar2(30),
                        constraint varchar2(30));


ALTER TABLE child ENABLE constraint fk_parent  EXCEPTIONS INTO EXCEPTIONS; 


Error report:
SQL Error: ORA-02298: Kan (ROB.FK_PARENT) niet valideren - bovenliggende sleutels zijn niet gevonden.
02298. 00000 - "cannot validate (%s.%s) - parent keys not found"
*Cause:    an alter table validating constraint failed because the table has
           child records.
*Action:   Obvious

Check the exceptions table for problems:

select * from exceptions;

ROW_ID OWNER                          TABLE_NAME                     CONSTRAINT                   
------ ------------------------------ ------------------------------ ------------------------------
AABA78 ROB                            CHILD                          FK_PARENT                      
AAFAAA                                                                                              
Ow9AAC 

select  * from child where rowid = 'AABA78AAFAAAOw9AAC';

Fix the problem

delete from child where pk = 3;

1 rows deleted.

ALTER TABLE child ENABLE constraint fk_parent  EXCEPTIONS INTO EXCEPTIONS;

table CHILD altered.

Constraint enabled and data correct

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An example of design is below: –  alwayshungry Sep 21 '12 at 0:42

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