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I'm looking for a suggestion. I have a Person class with String firstName and String lastName When i'm tying to insert the list values with the same String like :

set.add(new Person("firstName","lastName"))

set.add(new Person("firstName","lastName"))

The set doesn`t filter the objects and they still getting in the set. There is any suggestion to create set list without overriding the equales and hashcode functions? Maybe with guava or some groovy list? Thanks, Or.

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3  
What's the problem with overriding equals and hashCode? –  beny23 Sep 20 '12 at 8:02
    
My class is more complicated than the Person example. I am using groovy and i have a groovy class with 2 domains and more variables so i don't want to change my equal, i just need one time to create some Set that depends only in 2 Strings of my class. –  ork Sep 20 '12 at 8:12
    
If the code you provide is executed what do you want the result to be? Two persons in the set? The first person only in the set? Normally the result would be that just the second person remains in the set. –  OldCurmudgeon Sep 20 '12 at 8:16
1  
@ork In the end, you'll probably be much better off doing it the correct way, and getting equals and hashcode right... People are going to fall over this further down the line, assuming they are correctly implemented, not that you used a TreeSet with a custom comparator –  tim_yates Sep 20 '12 at 12:27
    
You right.. thank u. –  ork Sep 21 '12 at 18:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can create a TreeSet with your own Comparator.

Set<Person> set = new TreeSet<Person>(new Comparator<Person>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(Person p1, Person p2) {
        // Your own compare logic
    }
});
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4  
A clever, but probably not a good idea. Implement equals() and hashcode(), if you have to implement some method anyway. Just using TreeSet, when the functionality provided in not needed actually, is another bad idea. –  Adeel Ansari Sep 20 '12 at 8:27
    
@AdeelAnsari It all depends on the context. If it suits his needs then I can't really see the problem. –  maba Sep 20 '12 at 8:32
1  
Me neither, it seems to be a good fit for the problem. If you want a solution that solves the problem and makes "correct" use of collections then you could use a map, keyed with a new class that holds just the firstname and lastname fields. –  Link19 Sep 20 '12 at 8:36
2  
@GlenLamb: From the docs "Note that the ordering maintained by a set (whether or not an explicit comparator is provided) must be consistent with equals if it is to correctly implement the Set interface." –  Adeel Ansari Sep 20 '12 at 8:40
3  
@maba: Indeed, that's why you didn't get a downvote. Because it's valid, but not a good practice to not fulfil the general contract. And that was exactly my point. –  Adeel Ansari Sep 20 '12 at 8:49

In Guava there's an Equivalence class designed to such things. Create your own Equivalence class like this one:

import com.google.common.base.Equivalence;
import com.google.common.base.Objects;

public class PersonEquivalence extends Equivalence<Person> {

  @Override
  protected boolean doEquivalent(Person p1, Person p2) {
    return Objects.equal(p1.getFistName(), p2.getFistName())
        && Objects.equal(p1.getLastName(), p2.getLastName());
  }

  @Override
  protected int doHash(Person person) {
    return Objects.hashCode(person.getFistName(), person.getLastName());
  }

}

And then this code

Set<Equivalence.Wrapper<Person>> set = Sets.newHashSet();
PersonEquivalence personEquivalence = new PersonEquivalence();
set.add(personEquivalence.wrap(new Person("Joe", "Doe")));
set.add(personEquivalence.wrap(new Person("Joe", "Doe")));
set.add(personEquivalence.wrap(new Person("Jane", "Doe")));
System.out.println(set);

prints

[PersonEquivalence@8813f2.wrap(Person{firstName=Jane, lastName=Doe}),
 PersonEquivalence@8813f2.wrap(Person{firstName=Joe, lastName=Doe})]

Of course it's a bit verbose, but you can create ForwardingSet to automatically wrap and unwrap Persons for you.

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You can't, without violating the contract of Set. Either don't use a Set, or wrap the Person in another class that implements equals and hashcode based on the inner Person (see the other answer for a way to do this in Guava).

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Better say, "you shouldn't", instead of "you can't". +1 –  Adeel Ansari Sep 20 '12 at 8:28

Here's a rough attempt at my map suggestion.

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.Map;

public class PeopleCarrier implements Iterable<Person>{

    private Map<PersonKey, Person> storage = new HashMap<PersonKey, Person>();

    public void add(Person p) {
        PersonKey pk = new PersonKey(p);
        storage.put(pk, p);     
    }

    public boolean contains(Person p) {
        return storage.containsKey(new PersonKey(p));
    }

    @Override
    public Iterator<Person> iterator() {
        return new Iterator<Person>() {

            private Iterator<PersonKey> i = storage.keySet().iterator();

            @Override
            public void remove() {
                throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
            }

            @Override
            public Person next() {
                return storage.get(i.next());               
            }

            @Override
            public boolean hasNext() {
                return i.hasNext();
            }
        };
    }

    private class PersonKey {
        private String firstname;
        private String lastname;
        public PersonKey(Person p) {
            this.firstname = p.getFirstname();
            this.lastname = p.getLastname();
        }
        /* (non-Javadoc)
         * @see java.lang.Object#hashCode()
         */
        @Override
        public int hashCode() {
            final int prime = 31;
            int result = 1;
            result = prime * result + getOuterType().hashCode();
            result = prime * result
                    + ((firstname == null) ? 0 : firstname.hashCode());
            result = prime * result
                    + ((lastname == null) ? 0 : lastname.hashCode());
            return result;
        }
        /* (non-Javadoc)
         * @see java.lang.Object#equals(java.lang.Object)
         */
        @Override
        public boolean equals(Object obj) {
            if (this == obj)
                return true;
            if (obj == null)
                return false;
            if (!(obj instanceof PersonKey))
                return false;
            PersonKey other = (PersonKey) obj;
            if (!getOuterType().equals(other.getOuterType()))
                return false;
            if (firstname == null) {
                if (other.firstname != null)
                    return false;
            } else if (!firstname.equals(other.firstname))
                return false;
            if (lastname == null) {
                if (other.lastname != null)
                    return false;
            } else if (!lastname.equals(other.lastname))
                return false;
            return true;
        }
        private PeopleCarrier getOuterType() {
            return PeopleCarrier.this;
        }   

    }
}
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