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So I just started trying to learn jQuery an hour or so ago, and I've got this code

Just trying to work out why the $(".actions .readbody").click(...) line doesn't seem to be working.

I originally had this working where all the buttons were in a < ul > instead of a < div > (and each button had its own < li >). The readbody class got added to the Read body button's < li > instead of directly to the button. The problematic line was more like $(".actions li.readbody button").click(...).

The full code is posted on jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/J6u5X/

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3  
Please reproduce the issue on jsfiddle.net –  zerkms Sep 20 '12 at 8:28
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jsfiddle.net/J6u5X –  Bertie Wheen Sep 20 '12 at 8:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I jsFiddled your example - it is much easier to ... fiddle with the code this way. See http://jsfiddle.net/v7ayc/

First thing I noticed is the = operator in the while loop your click handler, I guess you meant ==.

Anyway, replacing the body of the function with the following code toggles the content:

$(this).parent('.actions').siblings('.body').toggle();

Generally speaking, jQuery offers much easier and readable ways of traversing the DOM. Feel free to use it instead of the standard DOM interface.

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Thanks! The = in the while was actually intentional; its how it traverses around. Anyway, thank you for that line of code. Shall now continue my jQuery journey :D –  Bertie Wheen Sep 20 '12 at 8:44

From the Link .actions does not have a child class .readbody? use $('.actions button').click.. or give your buttons a class name and just reference these in the click method

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$("#container").find(".article .actions").prepend("<button class='readbody'>Read Body</button>"); A button with the readbody class is added here –  Bertie Wheen Sep 20 '12 at 8:36

Refer this Link Jquery

  $(".test").val()
  $("#test").val()

 .test is class name of the HTML tag
 #test is id name of the HTML tag 
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What's your point? –  Bertie Wheen Sep 20 '12 at 8:45

The issue is that what your are trying to do within the click handler is not working. You are traversing too far up the chain with the two parentNode calls

var mybody = this.parentNode.parentNode

this needs be

var mybody = this.parentNode

you only need one to access the article body.

see an updated fiddle with it working as you expect http://jsfiddle.net/8zsr5/2/

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Thanks! This worked, but Tibo's answer is neater :P –  Bertie Wheen Sep 20 '12 at 8:43

I think the issue is that the JavaScript simply cannot find the element you require.

I've tinkered with your code to switch out the while loop and I've got it working. Here's a fiddle.

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This actually worked equally as well as Tibo's answer... what's the difference? –  Bertie Wheen Sep 20 '12 at 8:46
    
@Tibo's answer is actually slightly less efficient. His method siblings() returns a list of elements, in this instance returning one element since there is only one that matches the selector. My use of prev() is designed to return one element only. See siblings() and prev() –  James South Sep 20 '12 at 8:52
    
@James South: well, not mentioning which is more efficient, but the code based on .prev() is more fragile (which in most cases is more important) –  zerkms Sep 20 '12 at 8:58
    
@zerkms I wouldn't say it is more fragile. It doing the specific task. if something else changed in the DOM then both methods would be likely to fail. If there is a jQuery method designed to do a specific task then that should be the one to use. Incidentally I could have rewritten the entire method using on() which would be much less fragile than either answer. –  James South Sep 20 '12 at 9:07
    
"If there is a jQuery method designed to do a specific task then that should be the one to use" --- it's the worst argumentation ever. "would be likely to fail" -- the siblings() code is less likely to fail. I just want to note that "slightly less efficient" - isn't an argument as well. The decision should be made based on the better design, readability and maintainability, and in that case siblings solution is better. –  zerkms Sep 20 '12 at 10:16

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