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Given the following example:

var foo = {
    root:
        ({
            key1: "Value1",
            key2: "Value2",
            key3: "Value3"
        })
    };

What is the difference compared to the following:

var foo = {
    root:
        {
            key1: "Value1",
            key2: "Value2",
            key3: "Value3"
        }
    };

In the first example there is an additional parens wrapping the object. What purpose does this serve? Does it have anything to do with scoping? Does it influence the execution in any way? Thank you!

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1  
There's no difference. In both cases typeof(foo.root) return object but I've never seen the first syntax –  Fabrizio Calderan Sep 20 '12 at 9:02
    
Interesting, didn't know you could do that, i don't think there is a difference. Wonder what other have to say about this. –  Shikyo Sep 20 '12 at 9:04
    
I stared at both of the examples for half a minute and then had to read the text to actually see the difference.. Good question! –  Eric Lennartsson Sep 20 '12 at 9:11
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There is absolutely no difference here.

AFAIK the one place where it does make a difference is when you evaluate an object literal on the console.

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They do nothing :) They're there for readability, although it's questionable if they achieve that aim.

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As per me, we should use square brackets to collect the objects. because, JavaScript will understand that it is an array.

Round brackets(used in example 1) are just validated by the javasript parser. When you try to access it, java script returns Only last object in the round brackets(like top object in the stack).

Try below script

var foo = {
    root1:
        {
            key1: "Value1",
            key2: "Value2",
            key3: "Value3"
        },
    root2:({
            key4: "Value4",
            key5: "Value5"
          },{
            key6: "Value6",
            key7: "Value7"
        }),
    root3:[
         {
            key8: "Value8",
            key9: "Value9"
          },{
            key10: "Value10",
            key11: "Value11"
          }
    ]
    };
    console.log(foo['root1']);  // returns object { key1, key2, key3}
    console.log(foo['root2']);  // returns only { key6,key7}
    console.log(foo['root3']);  //returns [ {key8,key9},{key10,key11}]
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