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Im trying to implement a simple BigNumber package in c, that can perform arithmetic operations. However, Im stuck. Im fairly new at c, so Im not sure if Im using pointers and references right.

Heres my code so far:

#define MAXPARTS 60

struct BigNumber
{
    int parts[MAXPARTS];
};

typedef struct BigNumber BigNumber;

BigNumber newBigNumber()
{
    BigNumber bi;
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < MAXPARTS; i++)
    {
        bi.parts[i] = 0;
    }
    return bi;
}

void setPartTo(BigNumber *bigNumber, int i, int value)
{
    (*bigNumber).parts[i] = value;
}

int getPart(BigNumber bigNumber, int i, int value)
{
    return bigNumber.parts[i];
}

BigNumber add(BigNumber a, BigNumber b)
{
    int carrier = 0;
    BigNumber *result = &newBigNumber();
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < MAXPARTS; i++)
    {
        setPartTo(result, i, getPart(a, i)+getPart(b, i)+carrier);
    }
    return result;
}

I get an error at the setPartTo line in the add function. It says it expected a struct BigNumber * but got a BigNumber. I have been trying to change the thing before result, adding & and removing * where it looked reasonable, but so far, I havent got the thing to work. Could anybody point out whats wrong with it? As far as I can see, I pass on a pointer to the function setPartTo(), but maybe I dont. I also think that it would make sense not to pass on a pointer to a struct BigNumber to the function getPart, because it doesnt change the object, but maybe this is wrong as well?

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I see now, that also the add function isnt mathematically correct, but I would rather fix the other error first. –  user1661303 Sep 20 '12 at 10:11
    
plus, newBigNumber() is returning a local structure that's out of scope by the time you use it. You should malloc() a BigNumber and return a pointer to it. –  deStrangis Sep 20 '12 at 10:17
    
To avoid confusion change typedef struct BigNumber BigNumber; to typedef struct BigNumber_s BigNumber;. Following this adjust name of this struct where it is defined. –  alk Sep 20 '12 at 10:19
1  
@deStrangis: This is not correct. The stack allocated data will be copied to the lvalue provided in the call to newBigNumber(). –  alk Sep 20 '12 at 10:24
    
Besides all the other mess I really wonder why the compiler seems to reject a BigNumber* passed in, where a BigNumber* is expected, namely as 1st parameter to setPartTo(), as described by the OP. –  alk Sep 20 '12 at 10:28
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3 Answers

This:

setPartTo(result, i, getPart(a, i)+getPart(b, i)+carrier);

is incorrect as only two arguments are being passed to getPart(), which takes three arguments:

int getPart(BigNumber bigNumber, int i, int value)

the compiler will have emitted other errors in addition to the one posted in the question.

Additionally, as already mentioned by Graham Borland you need to store the return value of newBigNumber():

BigNumber result = newBigNumber();

and then pass the address of result, &result, into setPartTo().

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Your code:

void setPartTo(BigNumber *bigNumber, int i, int value)
{
   (*bigNumber).parts[i] = value;
}

This expects a pointer to a BigNumber, which might make it difficult to work with since you tend to use pass by value. You could write such a version of this, instead:

BigNumber setPartTo(BigNumber bigNumber, int i, int value)
{
  bigNumber.parts[i] = value;
  return bigNumber;
}

You might find that performance-wise, it's better to avoid passing big structs by value. On the other hand, your compiler might find that out too and optimize it for you. If you worry at all about this aspect, you should read the generated code, and profile/measure the performance, of course.

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The problem is here:

BigNumber *result = &newBigNumber();

newBigNumber() results the struct by value, and you can't take its address like this. You need to assign the struct to a variable, and then take its address later when needed.

BigNumber result = newBigNumber();

Then pass &result instead of result when you call setPartTo().

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