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thanks for your help... but still it doesn't print out 300,400 on the screen. below is my fullcode: reads a file[file contain: S(300,400)] passed at commandprompt and reads the two values contained in it without printing or reading the S, the 1st bracket, the comma or the last closing bracket

#include <stdio.h>
int a;
int b;
int main ( int argc, char *argv[] )
{

    if ( argc != 2 ) /* argc should be 2 for correct execution */
    {
        /* We print argv[0] assuming it is the program name */
        printf( "usage: %s filename", argv[0] );
    }
    else 
    {
        // We assume argv[1] is a filename to open
        FILE *file = fopen( argv[1], "r" );

        /* fopen returns 0, the NULL pointer, on failure */
        if ( file == 0 )
        {
            printf( "Could not open file\n" );
        }
        else 
        {
           /*reading file..
             while (fscanf(file, "S(%d,%d)", &a, &b) == 2)
            {
               printf("%d,%d", a, b);
            }


            fclose( file );
        }
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're doing it too complicated. Just include the non-numerical parts literally:

while(fscanf(file, "S(%d,%d)", &a, &b) == 2)
  printf("got S(%d,%d)\n", a, b);

Also, note that printf() doesn't support patterns, that doesn't make a lot of sense.

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thanks for your help... but still it doesn't print out 300,400 on the screen. below is my full code: –  Igbe Chukwudi Sep 20 '12 at 13:34
    
ok i got it...... thanks –  Igbe Chukwudi Sep 20 '12 at 14:34

There is no requirement for scan sets, just use:

while (2 == fscanf(file, "S(%d,%d)", &a, &b))
{
    printf("%d %d", a, b);
}

Compare 2 against the return value of fscanf() as the posted code could read just one integer (with fscanf() populating a only and returning 1) but incorrectly use both a and b.

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1  
I am surprised by your yoda comparison. –  E_net4 Sep 20 '12 at 11:02
    
@E_net4, just habit of always putting literals on the left (which are not modifiable). –  hmjd Sep 20 '12 at 11:04
2  
@E_net4 Surprised by your yoda comparison I am... –  halfelf Sep 20 '12 at 11:05
    
ok i got it thanks –  Igbe Chukwudi Sep 20 '12 at 14:35

I suggest using a utility for parsing and checking regular expressions. Here is one online: http://www.regextester.com/

There are many others...

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