Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a requirement to verify whether the postal code for a particular country is mandatory or not based on the countryid supplied. Currently I'm doing this with a switch statement but this code breaks the Open/Closed SOLID principle. I would like to know how to get rid of the switch in this scenario.

public class PostCodeVerifyMandatory : IPostCodeVerifyMandatory {
    public bool IsPostCodeRequired(int countryId, string region)
    {
        switch (countryId) {
            case 1:     //UK
            case 12:    //Australia
            case 29:    //Brazil
            case 31:    //Brunei
            case 37:    //Canada
            case 56:    //Denmark
            case 105:   //Japan
            case 110:   //South Korea
            case 114:   //Latvia
            case 136:   //Moldova
            case 137:   //Monaco
            case 145:   //Netherlands
            case 165:   //Poland
            case 166:   //Portugal
            case 183:   //Slovak Republic (Slovakia)
            case 189:   //Spain
            case 196:   //Sweden
            case 197:   //Switzerland
            case 199:   //Taiwan Region
            case 213:   //Ukraine
            case 215:   //USA
            case 221:   //Vietnam
                return true;
            case 232:   //Ireland
                return region == "Dublin";
            default:
                return false;
        }
    }

}
share|improve this question
3  
I don't know that anything else will make this simpler necessarily. So from a simplicity and readability POV, this may still be the best option. –  Tony The Lion Sep 20 '12 at 12:09
3  
Why do you say it breaks the SOLID principles? –  Nick Sep 20 '12 at 12:09
2  
I think more to the point I would put it in a database in case values are added or change, so avoid then having to recompile and deploy/ship. –  Justin Harvey Sep 20 '12 at 12:15
    
@Justin If it were a simple mapping from country code to Boolean that would be easy ... but there are cases like Ireland where additional logic is involved. –  David Sep 20 '12 at 12:27
2  
I would be concerned about how this list is maintained, does "CountryID" come from a database, or is it just hard coded in your application? If it's from the database, you could have 2 tables Country and Region with a FK to Country. The region table would have a RequiresPostCode flag. –  Matthew Sep 20 '12 at 13:27

4 Answers 4

Your switch statement effectively maps integers to booleans, with a default value of false.

So in this case, I would simply create a Dictionary<int,bool> with the appropriate values. Since the values are pretty much fixed, you could initialize it in the declaration:

Dictionary<int, bool> dict = new Dictionary<int, bool>() {
  {  1 /* UK */,        true  }, 
  { 12 /* Australia */, false } 
    ...etc...
};

As @Nick points out, the case for Ireland means you'll still need some extra logic, so you'll want the Dictionary to be private, and the answer accessible via your IsPostCodeRequired(int,strnig) method.

EDIT:
It would probably be best to get these values from a database, as @JustinHarvey points out.

If you want to be very strict about the Open/Closed Principle, you could use the Strategy design pattern - you would create a separate ConcreteStrategy object for every country. If a new country were added, you would create a new ConcreteStrategy object for that country. That way you can add the logic for countries with special rules, without touching your original code.
However, the number of countries with special rules is probably very small, so unless you really cannot change the code once it's in production, this is over-engineering.

share|improve this answer
    
What about case 232? –  Nick Sep 20 '12 at 12:11
    
Does it have other pros than being something you can change at runtime? It's hard to see what conditions leads to what, it's slower, case 232 doesn't fit and these are all values that do not change at runtime so what's the upside of this approach? –  Rune FS Sep 20 '12 at 12:14
    
@ Rune FS The performance hit should be negligible. As @JustinHarvey points out, it would probably be best to get these values from a database, but that wasn't the question. I think the case for 232 is handled in my edit. –  S.L. Barth Sep 20 '12 at 12:19

Maybe something like this:

            private Dictionary<int, string> _dict;
            protected Dictionary<int, string> CountryDictionary
            {
                get
                {
                    if (_dict == null)
                    {
                        _dict = new Dictionary<int, string>();
                        _dict.Add(1, "UK");
                        _dict.Add(12, "Australia");
                        // and so on
                    }

                    return _dict;
                }
            }

            public class PostCodeVerifyMandatory : IPostCodeVerifyMandatory
            {
                public bool IsPostCodeRequired(int countryId, string region)
                {
                    return CountryDictionary.ContainsKey(countryId);
                }
            }
share|improve this answer
    
This solution again breaks open/closed principle, ill end up changing code for new country, besides i cant see how this will address Ireland case with this code. –  Learner Sep 20 '12 at 15:03

I'd probably follow that piece of advice from the c2 Wiki page "Switch statements smell" :

Using a database or TableOrientedProgramming is sometimes the appropriate "fix", not polymorphism. For example, store product classications are best handled in a database with many-to-many category tables, not case statements.

You could have something like :

public class Country 
{
  public List<Region> Regions { get; set; }

  public bool IsPostCodeRequiredByDefault { get; set; }
}

public class Region
{
  private bool? _isPostCodeRequired;

  public Country Country { get; set; }

  public bool IsPostCodeRequired 
  {
    get { return _isPostCodeRequired ?? Country.IsPostCodeRequiredByDefault; }
  }
}

Which also has the benefit of adressing a secondary "primitive obsession" smell by making region a first-class domain concept instead of just a string.

share|improve this answer

Try this:

public class PostCodeVerifyMandatory : IPostCodeVerifyMandatory
{
    public List<Func<int, string, bool>> Rules { get; private set; }

    public PostCodeVerifyMandatory()
    {
        Rules = new List<Func<int, string, bool>>();
    }

    public bool IsPostCodeRequired(int countryId, string region)
    {
        if(Rules == null)
            return false;

        return (Rules.Any(r => r(countryId, region)));
    }
}

You will have to load the ruleset, before using it:

var simpleCountries = new List<int> 
                {
                    1,  // UK
                    12,  // Australia
                    29,  // Brazil
                    56,   // Brunei
                    //..
                    //..
                    215,   //USA
                    221   //Vietnam
                };

var postCodeVerifier = new PostCodeVerifyMandatory();

// 1 rule for simple countries
postCodeVerifier.Rules.Add((id, region) => simpleCountries.Contains(id)); 

// Special rule for Ireland
postCodeVerifier.Rules.Add((id, region) => id == 232 && region.Equals("Dublin")); 

var a = postCodeVerifier.IsPostCodeRequired(232, "Dublin");

or to make it fully data driven (using dictionary as example):

var countries = new Dictionary<int, string> 
                {
                    { 1, null },      // UK
                    { 12, null },     // Australia
                    { 29, null },     // Brazil
                    { 56, null },     // Brunei
                    //..
                    //..
                    { 215, null },    //USA
                    { 221, null },    //Vietnam
                    { 232, "Dublin" } // Ireland
                };

var postCodeVerifier = new PostCodeVerifyMandatory();

// 1 rule for all
postCodeVerifier.Rules.Add((id, region) => 
                              countries.ContainsKey(id) && 
                              (countries[id] ?? region) == region);
share|improve this answer
    
Apologies for delayed reply was on holiday...thanks Tommy for the response..none of the solutions suggested here keep integrity of open/closed principle..i'm looking for solution which can help me not break open/closed principle for future extensions or maybe my case is an exception and i can't abide with solid principles. –  Learner Oct 9 '12 at 10:15
    
No problem, I'm curious, could you please tell me how my last example violates Open/Closed principle (the fully data driven one) ? –  Tommy Grovnes Oct 9 '12 at 12:38
    
Data driven example is pretty much what i have done with switch case originally..open/closed is violated when a new country is added resulting in modification of existing code. –  Learner Oct 9 '12 at 14:33
    
In my example the data is "external" to the class and can be loaded from config or a database table (i picked dictionary to keep the example easy to read), when a new country is added you just update the config/database - no code change neccessary. –  Tommy Grovnes Oct 9 '12 at 14:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.