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How to count in SQL all fields with null values in one record?

I have table with five columns:

Name     DOB    Email      phone   jobtitle
abc     null   a@c.com      null       null
bbc     null    null        null       null

How do I write a query so that I can find the number of null columns in a row?

(e.g. Row 1 is having 3 null value, and row 2 is having 4 null values.)

I am using SQL Server 2008.

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marked as duplicate by Martin Smith, Aaron Bertrand, LittleBobbyTables, pstrjds, t-clausen.dk Sep 20 '12 at 13:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Welcome. Where is the problem? What have you tried? –  stb Sep 20 '12 at 13:15
    
I have a online form with 76 columns. If candidate fill only 30 then I have to show the percentage of the form –  vikas Sep 20 '12 at 13:18
    
Thanks martin you are right –  vikas Sep 20 '12 at 13:23

2 Answers 2

The naive way:

SELECT CASE WHEN Name IS NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END +
    CASE WHEN DOB IS NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END +       
    CASE WHEN Email IS NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END +       
    CASE WHEN phone IS NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END +       
    CASE WHEN jobtitle IS NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END

But I wouldn't want to write 76 of these. So how about the dynamic way (untested, but something along these lines):

DECLARE @SQL NVARCHAR(4000);    
SET @SQL = 'SELECT theTable.ID, ' + 
    STUFF((SELECT '+ CASE WHEN ' + QUOTENAME(COLUMN_NAME) + 
        ' IS NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END' 
        FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS 
        WHERE TABLE_NAME = 'theTable' FOR XML PATH('')) , 1 , 1 , '') 
    + ' FROM theTable';    
EXEC(@SQL);
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1  
this is an example. I have 76 columns in my table –  vikas Sep 20 '12 at 13:17
5  
IF is not valid in a query this way in SQL Server. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 20 '12 at 13:18
    
@AaronBertrand Yes yes, you're quite right. –  lc. Sep 20 '12 at 13:40

I think the only way is to specify each of your columns

select sum(case when item1 is null then 1 else 0 end
          +case when item2 is null then 1 else 0 end
          +case when item3 is null then 1 else 0 end
          +case when item4 is null then 1 else 0 end
          +case when item5 is null then 1 else 0 end
          +case when item6 is null then 1 else 0 end
          ) as grandtotalnulls
  from yourtable
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There are ways to do this without writing 76 CASE expressions (and how is this different from solutions that came before yours?). Please look at the duplicate. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 20 '12 at 13:34

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