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#include <stdio.h>
typedef struct TESTCASE{
    char *before; 
}ts;
int main(void) {
     ts t[2] = {{"abcd"}, 
                {"abcd"}};
     t[0].before[0] = t[0].before[2] = t[0].before[3] = 'b';
     printf("%s - %s\n", t[0].before, t[1].before);
     return 0;
}

the output is

bbbb - bbbb

I compile with gcc in Cygwin

cc -g test.c -o test

my question is, with what compile option, I can reap a result of bbbb - abcd?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Macmade, Tony The Lion, Eitan T, Evgeny Kluev, Jonathan Leffler Mar 3 at 3:05

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Didn't the daemons coming out of your nose hurt? –  user529758 Sep 20 '12 at 13:57
    
This question appears to be off-topic because it is a duplicate (but finding the duplicate is hard) and because it is unlikely to help other people in the future. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 3 at 3:05
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2 Answers 2

You are not supposed to write the strings, they are "immutable", writing to it results in undefined behaviour.

Because of that, the compiler is free to use the same location for both strings.

Hint: strdup() - what does it do in C?

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t[0].before[3] = 'b'; will do a segmentation fault on some systems. You can't write into a constant string.

#include <stdio.h>
typedef struct TESTCASE{
  char before[5];
}ts;
int main(void) {
  ts t[2] = {{ {'a','b','c','d',0} },
             { {'a','b','c','d',0} }};
  t[0].before[0] = t[0].before[2] = t[0].before[3] = 'b';
  printf("%s - %s\n", t[0].before, t[1].before);
  return 0;
}
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Linux and AIX (with XLC) being two such systems that will seg fault. –  Keith Halligan Sep 20 '12 at 14:06
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