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I keep in mind that hash would be first thing I should resort to if I want to write an application which requests high lookup speed, and any other data structure wouldn't guarantee that.

But I got confused when saw some many post saying different, such as suffix tree, trie, to name a few.

So I wonder is hash always the best thing for high speed lookup? What if I want both high lookup speed and less space cost?

Is there any material (books or papers) lecturing about the data structures or algorithms **on high speed lookup and space efficiency? Any of this kind is highly appreciated.

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There is never such a thing Best data structure for [some generic issue]. Everything is case dependent. Tries and radix trees might be great for strings, since you need to read the string anyway. arrays allows simplicity and great cache efficiency - and are usually the best for small scale static information –  amit Sep 20 '12 at 13:24
    
@amit, yes you're right. –  Alcott Sep 20 '12 at 13:26
    
Also: related - Hash Table v/s Trees –  amit Sep 20 '12 at 13:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I assume you are talking about strings here, and the answer is "no", hashes are not the fastest or most space efficient way to look up strings, tries are. Of course, writing a hashing algorithm is much, much easier than writing a trie.

One thing you won't find in wikipedia or books about tries is that if you naively implement them with one node per letter, you end up with large numbers of inefficient, one-child nodes. To make a trie that really burns up the CPU you have to implement nodes so that they can have a variable number of characters. This, of course, is even harder than writing a plain trie.

I have written trie implementations that handle over a billion entries and I can tell you that if done properly it is insanely fast, nothing else compares.

One other issue with tries is that you have to write a custom heap, because if you just use some kind of generic memory management it will be slow. So in addition to implementing the trie, you have to implement the heap that the trie runs on. Pretty freakin complicated, but if you do it, you get batshit crazy speed.

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Upvoted. Haha, I like your words. BTW, how to write a great heap? –  Alcott Sep 21 '12 at 6:49
    
The heap is a big array. A pointer is maintained to the beginning of free space in the heap. When you add a node in the trie the node is added at this free space pointer. When a node is enlarged (due to the addition of a child, eg) the expanded node is moved to the beginning of the free space. This leaves a gap in the heap where the old node was. You then tell the node before the gap it now has neighboring free space (each node knows how much empty space is "in front of it"). If that node then needs to get enlarged, it is not moved, but is expanded in place. You also need to compact sometimes. –  Tyler Durden Sep 21 '12 at 16:27
    
hashes are not the fastest or most space efficient way to look up strings, tries are This is not completely true. tries has a LOT of overhead. The classic trie has a node for each prefix of any string, and each of those require an array of SIZE pointers, where SIZE is the size of your alphabet (256 for 8 bits chars). They are very cache-inefficeint as well, although they offer good theoretical complexity. Also - the optimization you are describing is not a trie, it is a radix tree (which are compressed tries). –  amit Sep 22 '12 at 7:17
    
So to conclude the previous comment: tries are not "the best for strings" if any - radix trees are. And they only offer the best theoretical asymptotic complexity - but the distance from that to be the best is a long one. Like everything in life - which is better is case dependent. @Alcott: mentioning you because these comments are important read before jumping into using tries for all string dictionaries. –  amit Sep 22 '12 at 7:22
    
@amit thank you so much. I learned new stuff. –  Alcott Sep 22 '12 at 8:22

So I wonder is hash always the best thing for high speed lookup?

No. As stated in comments:

There is never such a thing Best data structure for [some generic issue]. Everything is case dependent. Tries and radix trees might be great for strings, since you need to read the string anyway. arrays allows simplicity and great cache efficiency - and are usually the best for small scale static information
I once answered a related question of cases where a tree might be better then a hash table: Hash Table v/s Trees

What if I want both high lookup speed and less space cost?

The two might be self-contradicting. Even for the simple example of a hash table of size X vs a hash table of size 2*X. The bigger hash table is less likely to encounter collisions, and thus is expected to be faster then the smaller one.

Is there any material (books or papers) lecturing about the data structures or algorithms on high speed lookup and space efficiency?

Introduction to Algorithms provide a good walk through on the main data structure used. Any algorithm developed is trying to provide a good space and time efficiency, but like said, there is a trade off, and some algorithms might be better for specific cases then others.
Choosing the right algorithm/data structure/design for the specific problem is what engineering is about, isn't it?

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Only a good implementation of hash will give you good performance. And you cannot compare hash with Trie for all situations. Situations where Trie is applicable, is fast, but it can be costly in terms of memory, (again dependent on implementation).

But have you measured performance? Or it is unnecessary optimization you are looking for. Did the map fail you?

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Not really, I just wonder there are so many fancy data structures out there, what is the best for what situation. –  Alcott Sep 20 '12 at 13:31
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@Alcott: The best way to understand more about any data structures, is to code them, run them against some practical input size (which maybe huge, random, etc.), and compare. I suggest you solve some programming problems on codechef.com, it really helped me get the feel of all these fancy DSs! And you discover more DSs this way. –  Vinayak Garg Sep 20 '12 at 13:36
    
Thank you so much for the idea of codechef.com. –  Alcott Sep 20 '12 at 13:43
    
@Alcott: Hehe, codechef.com (or TopCoder, or SPOJ) will help you become a better programmer. From DS, to algorithms, to maths, and even language libraries etc. –  Vinayak Garg Sep 20 '12 at 13:49

That might also depend on the actual number of elements. In complexity theory a hash is not bad, but complexity theory is only good if the actual number of elements is bigger than some threshold.

I.e. if you have only 2 elements, there is a faster method than a hash ;-)

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hash table is O(1) average, while it is O(n) worst case which could be an issue for some apps. –  amit Sep 20 '12 at 13:25
    
Ok, I edited my answer, to make it easier to understand :-) –  lilalinux Sep 20 '12 at 13:35

Hash tables are a good general purpose structure but they can fail spectacularly if the hash function doesn't suit the input data. Worst case lookup is O(n). They also waste some space as you mentioned. Other general-purpose structures like balanced binary search trees have worse average case but better worst case performance than a hash table. This is important for real-time applications. A trie is a more special-purpose structure tailored to string lookup.

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