Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

According to the Qt documentation:

QObjects organize themselves in object trees. When you create a QObject with another object as parent, the object will automatically add itself to the parent's children() list. The parent takes ownership of the object; i.e., it will automatically delete its children in its destructor.

For me that implies when a QObject is being deleted, it goes through and calls delete on all the pointers it stores in its children list.

However, it is not necessary for children to be dynamically allocated, and it is perfectly legal to build QObject trees with stack allocated objects.

According to standard specifications, calling delete on a pointer that does not point to a dynamically allocated object is undefined behavior, which may result in anything from "nothing" to a program crash.

IMO it is unlikely for QObject, which is pretty much the backbone of the almost the entire collection of Qt classes to rely on something that could produce undefined behavior.

So, does QObject distinguish between stack and heap allocated children when deleting? And if so, how exactly?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

However, it is not necessary for children to be dynamically allocated, and it is perfectly legal to build QObject trees with stack allocated objects.

No. See QObject::~QObject():

Warning: All child objects are deleted. If any of these objects are on the stack or global, sooner or later your program will crash.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, should have taken a look at the destructor before asking all over... 10x –  ddriver Sep 20 '12 at 13:59
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.