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See this if you don't know vs2010 actually requires total ordering, and hence it require a user defined less.

one of answer said it is possible for binary search, but I don't think so, this because

  1. The hash function should be uniform, and it is better that load factor less than 1, it means, in most case, one element per hash slot. i.e. no need binary search.
  2. Obviously, it will slow down insertion because of locating the appropriate position.

How does hash-map benefit from this design? and how do we utilize this design?

thanks

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The hash function should be uniform, and it is better that load factor less than 1, it means, in most case, one element per hash slot. i.e. no need binary search.

There won't be at most one element per hash slot. Some buckets will have to keep more than one key. Unless the input is only from a pre-determined restricted set of values (i.e. perfect hashing), the hash function will have to deal with more inputs than the outputs that it can produce. There will be collisions; this is unavoidable in an implementation as generic as this one. However, good hash functions should produce well-distributed hashes and that makes the number of elements per hash slot stay low.

Obviously, it will slow down insertion because of locating the appropriate position.

Assuming a good hash function and non-degenerate input (input designed so that many elements result in the same hash), there will always be only a few keys per bucket. Inserting into such a binary search tree won't be that big of a cost, and that little cost may bring benefits elsewhere (searches may be faster than on an implementation with a linked list). And in case of degenerate input, the hash map will degenerate into a binary search tree, which is much better than a simple linked list.

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Your question is largely irrelevant in practice, because C++ now supplies unordered_map etc. which use an Equal predicate rather than a less-than comparator.

However, consider a hash_map<string, ...>. Clearly, the value space of string is larger than that of size_t, so for any hash function there will be values that have the same hash and so are placed in the same bucket. In the pathological situation where all the items in the hash table are placed in the same bucket, exploiting ordering among keys will result in improved speed of access, insertion and removal.

Note that search on an ordered list (or binary tree) is O(log n) as opposed to O(n).

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if we needn't order, than we can insert at the list head without any search. – Chang Sep 20 '12 at 14:17
    
@Chang no, because you need to determine whether the key is already present in the bucket. – ecatmur Sep 20 '12 at 14:20
    
Right, my last comment is wrong. but the real implementation is still using loop rather than binary search. and hence we need 2 comparison for equality, and slow down insertion. – Chang Sep 20 '12 at 14:31
    
@Chang why do you think the "real implementation" isn't using binary search? – ecatmur Sep 20 '12 at 14:37
    
sorry, i mean vs2010 doesn't utilize binary search – Chang Sep 20 '12 at 14:49

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