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I often find my self writing these pieces of code, specifically when I have to do something in a 2D array.

The loops are the same, except the operations inside are different and, most importantly, the operation in the last group depends on the first.

My main concern is: is there a more efficient code for large values of n,m?

for ( int y = 0 ; y < m ; ++y ) {
  for ( int x = 0 ; x < n ; ++x ) {
    if ( v[x][y] == z ) a = true;
  }
}

for ( int y = 0 ; y < m ; ++y ) {
  for ( int x = 0 ; x < n ; ++x ) {
    if ( a == true ) do_something( v[x][y] );
  }
}

Thanks in advance

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Is n>>m?, is a most of the times equal true? Does v[x][y] most of the time false (branch prediction), what compile do you use, what optimization, please supply more data –  Michael Sep 20 '12 at 14:47
    
Btw, i would also suggest partial loop unrolling which will definitely help if e.g v[x][y] not dependent of v[x]v[y+1] etc.. –  Michael Sep 20 '12 at 14:49
    
This was supposed to be general case about code structuring to be as efficient as possible to be applied in almost all cases. But I guess there's no other way around it. –  89Cookies Sep 20 '12 at 15:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the general case as you describe it, the answer is probably "no" - you imply that the operation of the second look relies on the first loop being completed, so you have to do just that.

However, in the specific case you've listed, there are two easy optimisations:

  1. fail fast out of the first loop: once a is set true there's no need to loop any further.
  2. move the if ( a == true ) outside of the second loop, so that it's only evaluated once and you skip the entire loop if it's false.
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In my code I already done 1) and will do 2) now. I just had hoped that there was a better way to do this I just didn't know. Thanks. –  89Cookies Sep 20 '12 at 14:59
for ( int y = 0 ; y < m && !a; ++y ) {
  for ( int x = 0 ; x < n && !a; ++x ) {
    if ( v[x][y] == z ) a = true;
  }
}

if ( a == true ) {
  for ( int y = 0 ; y < m ; ++y ) {
    for ( int x = 0 ; x < n ; ++x ) {
      do_something( v[x][y] );
    }
  }
}
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As per Code Complete: It depends on your programming language. What might give you a performance gain in programming language A might actually hurt performance in another language.

There are some techniques described in Code Complete such as Loop unrolling which could be a performance gain (for the first loop or if you could inline do_something).

Perhaps you can also escape/exit the loop(s) once a certain condition is true? For example once a=true, exit the first loop. (and as Findus already pointed out, only perform the second loop if a was set)

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Instead of terminating the first loop, you could continue and call do_something on the remaining values first (assuming the order doesn't matter). This will save iterations and cache. Then iterate back to the point where you found a to be true and go there.

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