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It is an interesting puzzle I came across , according to which , given an array , we need to find the ninja index in it.

A Ninja index is defined by these rules :

An index K such that all elements with smaller indexes have values lower or equal to A[K] and all elements with greater indexes have values greater or equal to A[K].

For example , consider :

A[0]=4, A[1]=2, A[2]=2, A[3]=3, A[4]=1, A[5]=4, A[6]=7, A[7]=8, A[8]=6, A[9]=9.

In this case, 5 is a ninja index , since A[r]<=A[5] for r = [0,k] and A[5]<=A[r] r = [k,n].

What algorithm shall we follow to find it in O(n) . I already have a brute force O(n^2) solution.

EDIT : There can be more than 1 ninja index , but we need to find the first one preferably. And in case there is no NI , then we shall return -1.

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3  
Nice problem. It can be connected to the well known sorting algorithm: "a single Quickort phase has just been run on the whole table. Identify which indexes might have been the pivot value" –  Rafał Dowgird Sep 21 '12 at 7:26
    
Yeah I also had that in mind. –  h4ck3d Sep 21 '12 at 11:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Precompute minimum values for all the suffixes of the array and maximum values for all prefixes. With this data every element can be checked for Ninja in O(1).

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Could you work it out on the array given ? –  h4ck3d Sep 20 '12 at 15:11
    
dynamic programming for da win –  Claudiu Sep 20 '12 at 15:13
    
@Claudiu , could you work it out on the example i have provided in the OP –  h4ck3d Sep 20 '12 at 15:16
6  
@sTEAK.: suffix minima array: min={1,1,1,1,1,4,6,6,6,9}, prefix maxima array: max={4,4,4,4,4,4,7,8,8,9}. Check for an index i such that A[i] < min[i+1] and A[i] > max[i-1]. For i == 5 we get A[5] = 4, max[4] = 4, min[6] = 6 - and it satisfied the conditions –  amit Sep 20 '12 at 15:28
1  
and in case it isn't clear, compute the suffix and prefix arrays each in O(n) (suffix going from last to first el, only need to compare current element i with the previously computed min suffix (i+1); prefix the other way around), then the final check takes O(n), O(3n) is in O(n) –  Claudiu Sep 20 '12 at 15:51

A python solution that will take O(3n) operations

def n_index1(a):
    max_i = []
    maxx = a[0]
    for j in range(len(a)):
        i=a[j]

        if maxx<=i and j!=0:
            maxx=i
            max_i.append(1)

        else:
            max_i.append(-1)



    return max_i

def n_index2(a):
    max_i = []
    maxx = -a[len(a)-1]
    for j in range(len(a)-1,-1,-1):
        i=-a[j] # mind the minus

        if maxx<=i and j!=len(a)-1:         
            maxx=i
            max_i.append(1)

        else:
            max_i.append(-1)

    return max_i

def parse_both(a,b):
    for i in range(len(a)):
        if a[i]==1 and b[len(b)-1-i]==1:
            return i

    return -1


def ninja_index(v):
    a = n_index1(v)
    b = n_index2(v)

    return parse_both(a,b)
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Well that's hardly comprehendable. –  h4ck3d Sep 20 '12 at 16:39
    
You should explain how it works. A code-only answer is of limited helpfulness. And you have an off-by-one error, if I'm not mistaken. But it's a good solution. –  Daniel Fischer Sep 23 '12 at 0:55

Another Python solution, following the same general approach. Maybe a bit shorter.

def ninja(lst):
    maxs = lst[::]
    mins = lst[::]
    for i in range(1, len(lst)):
        maxs[   i] = max(maxs[   i], maxs[ i-1])
        mins[-1-i] = min(mins[-1-i], mins[-i  ])
    return [i for i in range(len(lst)) if maxs[i] <= lst[i] <= mins[i]]

I guess it could be optimized a bit w.r.t that list-copying-action, but this way it's more concise.

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This straight-forward Java code calculates leftmost index that has property "all elements rightwards are not lesser":

private static int fwd(int[] a) {
    int i = -1;
    for (int j = 0; j < a.length - 1; j++) {
        if (a[j + 1] >= a[j] && i == -1) {
            i = j + 1;
        } else if (i != -1 && a[j + 1] < a[i]) {
            i = -1;
        }
    }
    return i;
}

Almost same code calculates leftmost index that has property "all elements leftwards are not greater":

private static int bwd(int[] a) {
    int i = -1;
    for (int j = 0; j < a.length - 1; j++) {
        if (a[j + 1] >= a[j] && i == -1) {
            i = j + 1;
        } else if (i != -1 && a[j + 1] < a[i]) {
            i = -1;
        }
    }
    return i;
}

If results are the same, leftmost Ninja index is found.

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