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I have an input file as following. I need to break them into multiple files based on the columns 2,3&5. The file has more columns but i have used cut command to get only the required columns.

12,Accounts,India,free,Internal
13,Finance,China,used,Internal
16,Finance,China,free,Internal
12,HR,India,free,External
19,HR,China,used,Internal
33,Finance,Japan,free,Internal
39,Accounts,US,used,External
14,Accounts,Japan,used,External
11,Finance,India,used,External
11,HR,US,used,External
10,HR,India,used,External

Output files:

Accounts_India_Internal --
12,Accounts,India,free,Internal

Finance_China_Internal --
13,Finance,China,used,Internal
16,Finance,China,free,Internal

HR_India_External --
12,HR,India,free,External
10,HR,India,used,External

HR_China_Internal --
19,HR,China,used,Internal

and so on..

Please let me know how to achieve this.

As of now, I am thinking to sort the file based on these columns (2,3,5) and then run a loop on each record and start creating files. If a file does not exist, then create and add the record. Otherwise open the old file and add the record.

Is it possible to do this using shell scripting (bash)?

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I used sort command and sorted the file based on these 3 columns. –  Anuj Sep 20 '12 at 15:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is it possible to do this using shell scripting (bash)?

If you simply want to split the files based on fields 2, 3 and 5 you can do that quickly with awk:

awk -F, '{print >> $2"_"$3"_"$5}' infile.txt 

That appends each line to a file whose name is made up of fields 2, 3 and 5.

Example:

[me@home]$ awk -F, '{print >> $2"_"$3"_"$5}' infile.txt 
[me@home]$ cat Accounts_India_Internal
12,Accounts,India,free,Internal
[me@home]$ cat Finance_China_Internal
13,Finance,China,used,Internal
16,Finance,China,free,Internal

If you do want output sorted, you can first run the file through sort.

sort -k2,3 -k5,5 -t, infile.txt  | awk -F, '{print >> $2"_"$3"_"$5}'

That sorts the lines on fields 2, 3, and 5 before passing them on to the awk command.

Do note that the we're appending to the files so if you repeat the command without deleting the output files, you'll end up with duplicate data in the output files. To address this, as well as include your additional requirements (using first line as header for all new files) as mentioned in the chat, see this solution.

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2  
That's surprisingly cool-looking for awk. Do you really need to sort? –  TLP Sep 20 '12 at 15:43
    
Yes. This is exactly what i needed. Thanks. Can you please suggest me a good book/tutorial on awk. Also, what if i want to put some condition in that print. Let's say what if i need to create separate files including column 4 also when column 2 is HR? –  Anuj Sep 20 '12 at 15:45
    
@TLP No, sort is not really required for the file splitting (was in the midst of editing that in ;) ). However, if the OP wants the final results sorted then it's easier to sort the contents first before splitting. –  Shawn Chin Sep 20 '12 at 15:48
1  
@Anuj I learned awk incrementally over the years so I cannot vouch for any book, but I'm sure any book and/or online tutorials can get you started. After that, you'll just get more familiar with it as you use it. Browsing/answering awk questions on Stack Overflow helped me a lot ;) –  Shawn Chin Sep 20 '12 at 15:51
    
@Anuj and yes, it is possible to use if statements in awk. But a more awk-like approach would be awk -F, '$2=="HR"{print >> "hr.txt"}' infile.txt which appends lines to hr.txt when field 2 is "HR". You can combine that into the above command like so -- awk -F, '{print >> $2"_"$3"_"$5}; $2=="HR"{print >> hr.txt}' infile.txt –  Shawn Chin Sep 20 '12 at 15:55

Note: To use the code, simply change <DATA> to <> and use the file name as argument. The Data::Dumper print is there only for demonstration purposes and can also be removed.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my %h;
while (<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    my @data = split /,/;
    my $file = join "_", @data[1,2,4];
    push @{$h{$file}}, $_;
}
print Dumper \%h;

__DATA__
12,Accounts,India,free,Internal
13,Finance,China,used,Internal
16,Finance,China,free,Internal
12,HR,India,free,External
19,HR,China,used,Internal
33,Finance,Japan,free,Internal
39,Accounts,US,used,External
14,Accounts,Japan,used,External
11,Finance,India,used,External
11,HR,US,used,External
10,HR,India,used,External

To print the files, you could use a subroutine like so:

for my $key (keys %h) {
    print_file($key, $h{$key};
}
sub print_file {
    my ($file, $data) = @_;
    open my $fh, ">", $file or die $!;
    print $fh "$_\n" for @$data;
}
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I suggest you keep a hash of file handles keyed by their corresponding file names

This program demonstrates. The input file is expected as a parameter on the command line

use strict;
use warnings;

my %fh;

while (<>) {
  chomp;
  my $filename = join '_', (split /,/)[1,2,4];
  if (not $fh{$filename}) {
    open $fh{$filename}, '>', $filename or die "Unable to open '$filename' for output: $!";
    print "$filename created\n";
  }
  print { $fh{$filename} } $_, "\n";
}

output

Accounts_India_Internal created
Finance_China_Internal created
HR_India_External created
HR_China_Internal created
Finance_Japan_Internal created
Accounts_US_External created
Accounts_Japan_External created
Finance_India_External created
HR_US_External created
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This is also working for me. Thanks. –  Anuj Sep 20 '12 at 15:51

save input text as foo, then:

cat foo | perl -nle '$k = join "_", (split ",", $_)[1,2,4]; $t{$k} = [@{$t{$k}}, $_]; END{for (keys %t){print join "\n", "$_ --", @{$t{$_}}, undef }}' | csplit -sz - '/^$/' {*}
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