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I have a helper function which returns a table like this:

function of_type(expected_type)
    return {
        expected = expected_type,
        matches = function(value) return type(value) == expected_type end,
        describe = "type " .. expected_type
    }
end

Now this was fine with other matchers but here I would like to store the type(value) to a field in the same table when the matches function is called. Something like this:

function of_type(expected_type)
    return {
        expected = expected_type,
        mismatch = nil, -- set it to nil on initialization
        matches = function(value) 
            mismatch = type(value)  -- how to do this?
            return type(value) == expected_type
        end,
        describe = "type " .. expected_type
    }
end

Is this possible?

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1  
I do not recommend doing this. It is counterintuitive for a "passive" method like matches to change the state of the object. Consider returning multiple values instead, e.g. return false, mismatch if the types don't match. –  finnw Sep 20 '12 at 18:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, but you need to split it into steps:

function of_type(expected_type)
    local tbl = {
        expected = expected_type,
        mismatch = nil, -- set it to nil on initialization
        describe = "type " .. expected_type
    }
    tbl.matches = function(value) 
        tbl.mismatch = type(value)
        return type(value) == tbl.expected
    end
    return tbl
end

-- testing it
local foo = of_type("string")
print(foo.matches(1), foo.matches("1"))

This should output false true as you would expect.

Essentially, tbl.matches will store the reference to tbl (it's called "upvalue") and will be able to modify all the fields in that table (including the reference to itself it in).

Another way to do this would be the following (notice the changes in the tbl.matches function). Instead of capturing it as an upvalue, you can use tbl:method semantic and pass tbl as implicit self parameter:

    function of_type(expected_type)
        local tbl = {
            expected = expected_type,
            mismatch = nil, -- set it to nil on initialization
            describe = "type " .. expected_type
        }
        function tbl:matches(value) 
                self.mismatch = type(value)  -- how to do this?
                return type(value) == self.expected
            end
        return tbl
    end

local foo = of_type("string")
print(foo:matches(1), foo:matches("1"))

This will print the same result. Notice that you are using foo:matches notation to make foo to be passed as the first parameter (references as self in the method). This is the same as using foo.matches(foo, 1).

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I'm marking this as accepted because you did thoroughly answer my question. However I will go by the suggestion of @finnw and instead return both the boolean and the mismatch description from the function so there's no unnecessary state information left dangling in the table. –  vertti Sep 21 '12 at 13:13

You don't. Well, not without storing a copy of the table, or passing the function the table as a parameter. Until all of the statements of the table constructor have been processed, the table doesn't exist yet. And since you never stored it anywhere (in this function), your function can't name it in order to find it.

So you should give it a name, even just for a moment:

function of_type(expected_type)
  local temp = nil
  temp = {
        expected = expected_type,
        mismatch = nil, -- set it to nil on initialization
        matches = function(value) 
            temp.mismatch = type(value)  -- Like this
            return type(value) == expected_type
        end,
        describe = "type " .. expected_type
    }
  return temp
end

This works because Lua will store temp as an upvalue. Thus, the function you're creating will see changes in temp, such as when you set it to a table value. And since it's a local variable, it won't be visible outside of this function.

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