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Suppose you have a list of unsigned ints. Suppose some elements are equal to 0 and you want to push them back. Currently I use this code (list is a pointer to a list of unsigned ints of size n

for (i = 0; i < n; ++i) 
{    
    if (list[i])
        continue;
    int j;
    for (j = i + 1; j < n && !list[j]; ++j);
    int z;
    for (z = j + 1; z < n && list[z]; ++z);
    if (j == n)
        break;
    memmove(&(list[i]), &(list[j]), sizeof(unsigned int) * (z - j)));
    int s = z - j + i;
    for(j = s; j < z; ++j) 
        list[j] = 0;
    i = s - 1;
} 

Can you think of a more efficient way to perform this task?

The snippet is purely theoretical, in the production code, each element of list is a 64 bytes struct

EDIT: I'll post my solution. Many thanks to Jonathan Leffler.

void RemoveDeadParticles(int * list, int * n)
{
    int i, j = *n - 1;
    for (; j >= 0 && list[j] == 0; --j);
    for (i = 0; i <= j; ++i)
    {   
        if (list[i])
            continue;
        memcpy(&(list[i]), &(list[j]), sizeof(int));
        list[j] = 0;
        for (; j >= 0 && list[j] == 0; --j);
        if (i == j)
            break;
    }   

    *n = i;
}
share|improve this question
    
i assume you want to preserve the ordering between non-zero elements. –  UmNyobe Sep 20 '12 at 15:23
    
No, order is irrelevant. What I need is that elemens between l[0] and l[x] are not zero and every element between l[x+1] and l[n - 1] are zero –  Patrik Sep 20 '12 at 15:28
1  
Using lower-case ell l as a variable name is risky; it looks a lot like 1. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 20 '12 at 15:38
    
There's a straight linear O(N) algorithm if you're careful; your's is O(N^2). Given that order is irrelevant, every time you encounter a zero going forwards through the array, you swap it with the last element that might not be a zero. That's one pass through the array. Care is required on the boundary conditions. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 20 '12 at 15:43
    
It's worth a shot. Good call –  Patrik Sep 20 '12 at 15:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code below implements the linear algorithm I outlined in a comment:

There's a straight linear O(N) algorithm if you're careful; your's is O(N2). Given that order is irrelevant, every time you encounter a zero going forwards through the array, you swap it with the last element that might not be a zero. That's one pass through the array. Care is required on the boundary conditions.

Care was required; the acid test of list3[] in the test code caused grief until I got the the boundary conditions right. Note that a list of size 0 or 1 is already in the correct order.

#include <stdio.h>
#define DIM(x)  (sizeof(x)/sizeof(*(x)))

extern void shunt_zeroes(int *list, size_t n);

void shunt_zeroes(int *list, size_t n)
{
    if (n > 1)
    {
        size_t tail = n;
        for (size_t i = 0; i < tail - 1; i++)
        {
            if (list[i] == 0)
            {
                while (--tail > i + 1 && list[tail] == 0)
                    ;
                if (tail > i)
                {
                    int t = list[i];
                    list[i] = list[tail];
                    list[tail] = t;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

static void dump_list(const char *tag, int *list, size_t n)
{
    printf("%-8s", tag);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        printf("%d ", list[i]);
    }
    putchar('\n');
    fflush(0);
}

static void test_list(int *list, size_t n)
{
    dump_list("Before:", list, n);
    shunt_zeroes(list, n);
    dump_list("After:", list, n);
}

int main(void)
{
    int list1[] = { 1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5 };
    int list2[] = { 1, 2, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 0 };
    int list3[] = { 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 };
    int list4[] = { 0, 1 };
    int list5[] = { 0, 0 };
    int list6[] = { 0 };
    test_list(list1, DIM(list1));
    test_list(list2, DIM(list2));
    test_list(list3, DIM(list3));
    test_list(list4, DIM(list4));
    test_list(list5, DIM(list5));
    test_list(list6, DIM(list6));
}

Example run:

$ shuntzeroes
Before: 1 0 2 0 3 0 4 0 5 
After:  1 5 2 4 3 0 0 0 0 
Before: 1 2 2 0 3 0 4 0 0 
After:  1 2 2 4 3 0 0 0 0 
Before: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 
After:  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 
Before: 0 1 
After:  1 0 
Before: 0 0 
After:  0 0 
Before: 0 
After:  0 
$

Complexity of code

I've asserted that the original code in the question and in the answer by UmNyobe is O(N2) but that this is O(N). However, there is a loop inside a loop in all three cases; why is this answer linear when the others are O(N2)?

Good question!

The difference is that the inner loop in my code scans backwards over the array, finding a non-zero value to swap with the zero that was just found. In doing so, it reduces the work to be done by the outer loop. So, the i index scans forward, once, and the tail index scans backwards once, until the two meet in the middle. By contrast, in the original code, the inner loops start at the current index and work forwards to the end each time, which leads to the quadratic behaviour.


Demonstration of complexity

Both UmNyobe and Argeman have asserted that the code in UmNyobe's answer is linear, O(N), and not quadratic, O(N2) as I asserted in comments to the answer. Given two counter-views, I wrote a program to check my assertions.

Here is the result of a test that amply demonstrates this. The code described by "timer.h" is my platform neutral timing interface; its code can be made available on request (see my profile). The test was performed on a MacBook Pro with 2.3 GHz Intel Core i7, Mac OS X 10.7.5, GCC 4.7.1.

The only changes I made to UmNyobe's code were to change the array indexes from int to size_t so that the external function interface was the same as mine, and for internal consistency.

The test code includes a warmup exercise to show that the functions produce equivalent answers; UmNyobe's answer preserves order in the array and mine does not. I've omitted that information from the timing data.

$ make on2
gcc -O3 -g -I/Users/jleffler/inc -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -L/Users/jleffler/lib/64 on2.c -ljl -o on2
$

Timing

Set 1: on an older version of the test harness without UmNyobe's amended algorithm.

shunt_zeroes:        100    0.000001
shunt_zeroes:       1000    0.000005
shunt_zeroes:      10000    0.000020
shunt_zeroes:     100000    0.000181
shunt_zeroes:    1000000    0.001468
pushbackzeros:       100    0.000001
pushbackzeros:      1000    0.000086
pushbackzeros:     10000    0.007003
pushbackzeros:    100000    0.624870
pushbackzeros:   1000000   46.928721
shunt_zeroes:        100    0.000000
shunt_zeroes:       1000    0.000002
shunt_zeroes:      10000    0.000011
shunt_zeroes:     100000    0.000113
shunt_zeroes:    1000000    0.000923
pushbackzeros:       100    0.000001
pushbackzeros:      1000    0.000097
pushbackzeros:     10000    0.007077
pushbackzeros:    100000    0.628327
pushbackzeros:   1000000   41.512151

There was at most a very light background load on the machine; I'd suspended the Boinc calculations that I normally have running in the background, for example. The detailed timing isn't as stable as I'd like, but the conclusion is clear.

  • My algorithm is O(N)
  • UmNyobe's (original) algorithm is O(N2)

Set 2: With UmNyobe's amended algorithm

Also including Patrik's before and after algorithms, and Wildplasser's algorithm (see source below); test program renamed from on2 to timezeromoves.

$ ./timezeromoves -c -m 100000 -n 1
shunt_zeroes: (Jonathan)
shunt_zeroes:        100    0.000001
shunt_zeroes:       1000    0.000003
shunt_zeroes:      10000    0.000018
shunt_zeroes:     100000    0.000155
RemoveDead: (Patrik)
RemoveDead:          100    0.000001
RemoveDead:         1000    0.000004
RemoveDead:        10000    0.000018
RemoveDead:       100000    0.000159
pushbackzeros2: (UmNyobe)
pushbackzeros2:      100    0.000001
pushbackzeros2:     1000    0.000005
pushbackzeros2:    10000    0.000031
pushbackzeros2:   100000    0.000449
list_compact: (Wildplasser)
list_compact:        100    0.000004
list_compact:       1000    0.000005
list_compact:      10000    0.000036
list_compact:     100000    0.000385
shufflezeroes: (Patrik)
shufflezeroes:       100    0.000003
shufflezeroes:      1000    0.000069
shufflezeroes:     10000    0.006685
shufflezeroes:    100000    0.504551
pushbackzeros: (UmNyobe)
pushbackzeros:       100    0.000003
pushbackzeros:      1000    0.000126
pushbackzeros:     10000    0.011719
pushbackzeros:    100000    0.480458
$

This shows that UmNyobe's amended algorithm is O(N), as are the other solutions. The original code is shown to be O(N2), as was UmNyobe's original algorithm.

Source

This is the amended test program (renamed to testzeromoves.c). The algorithm implementations are at the top. The test harness is after the comment 'Test Harness'. The command can do the checks or the timing or both (default); it does two iterations by default; it goes up to a size of one million entries by default. You can use the -c flag to omit checking, the -t flag to omit timing, the -n flag to specify the number of iterations, and the -m flag to specify the maximum size. Be cautious about going above one million; you'll probably run into issues with the VLA (variable length array) blowing the stack. It would be easy to modify the code to use malloc() and free() instead; it doesn't seem necessary, though.

#include <string.h>

#define MAX(x, y)   (((x) > (y)) ? (x) : (y))

extern void shunt_zeroes(int *list, size_t n);
extern void pushbackzeros(int *list, size_t n);
extern void pushbackzeros2(int *list, size_t n);
extern void shufflezeroes(int *list, size_t n);
extern void RemoveDead(int *list, size_t n);
extern void list_compact(int *arr, size_t cnt);

void list_compact(int *arr, size_t cnt)
{
    size_t dst,src,pos;

    /* Skip leading filled area; find start of blanks */
    for (pos=0; pos < cnt; pos++) {
        if ( !arr[pos] ) break;
    }
    if (pos == cnt) return;

    for(dst= pos; ++pos < cnt; ) { 
        /* Skip blanks; find start of filled area */
        if ( !arr[pos] ) continue;

        /* Find end of filled area */
        for(src = pos; ++pos < cnt; ) {
            if ( !arr[pos] ) break;
        }   
        if (pos > src) {
            memmove(arr+dst, arr+src, (pos-src) * sizeof arr[0] );
            dst += pos-src;
        }   
    }
}

/* Cannot change j to size_t safely; algorithm relies on it going negative */
void RemoveDead(int *list, size_t n)
{
    int i, j = n - 1;
    for (; j >= 0 && list[j] == 0; --j)
        ;
    for (i = 0; i <= j; ++i)
    {   
        if (list[i])
            continue;
        memcpy(&(list[i]), &(list[j]), sizeof(int));
        list[j] = 0;
        for (; j >= 0 && list[j] == 0; --j);
        if (i == j)
            break;
    }   
}

void shufflezeroes(int *list, size_t n)
{
    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i) 
    {    
        if (list[i])
            continue;
        size_t j;
        for (j = i + 1; j < n && !list[j]; ++j)
            ;
        size_t z;
        for (z = j + 1; z < n && list[z]; ++z)
            ;
        if (j == n)
            break;
        memmove(&(list[i]), &(list[j]), sizeof(int) * (z - j));
        size_t s = z - j + i;
        for(j = s; j < z; ++j) 
            list[j] = 0;
        i = s - 1;
    } 
}

static int nextZero(int* list, size_t start, size_t n){
   size_t i = start;
   while(i < n && list[i])
        i++;
   return i;
}

static int nextNonZero(int* list, size_t start, size_t n){
   size_t i = start;
   while(i < n && !list[i])
        i++;
   return i;
}

void pushbackzeros(int* list, size_t n){
    size_t i = 0;
    size_t j = 0;
    while(i < n && j < n){
         i = nextZero(list,i, n);
         j = nextNonZero(list,i, n);
         if(i >= n || j >=n)
             return;
         list[i] = list[j];
         list[j] = 0;
    }
}

/* Amended algorithm */
void pushbackzeros2(int* list, size_t n){
    size_t i = 0;
    size_t j = 0;
    while(i < n && j < n){
         i = nextZero(list, i, n);
         j = nextNonZero(list, MAX(i,j), n);
         if(i >= n || j >=n)
             return;
         list[i] = list[j];
         list[j] = 0;
    }
}

void shunt_zeroes(int *list, size_t n)
{
    if (n > 1)
    {
        size_t tail = n;
        for (size_t i = 0; i < tail - 1; i++)
        {
            if (list[i] == 0)
            {
                while (--tail > i + 1 && list[tail] == 0)
                    ;
                if (tail > i)
                {
                    int t = list[i];
                    list[i] = list[tail];
                    list[tail] = t;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

/* Test Harness */

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "timer.h"

#define DIM(x)      (sizeof(x)/sizeof(*(x)))

typedef void (*Shunter)(int *list, size_t n);

typedef struct FUT      /* FUT = Function Under Test */
{
    Shunter function;
    const char *name;
    const char *author;
} FUT;

static int tflag = 1;   /* timing */
static int cflag = 1;   /* checking */
static size_t maxsize = 1000000;

static void dump_list(const char *tag, int *list, size_t n)
{
    printf("%-8s", tag);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        printf("%d ", list[i]);
    }
    putchar('\n');
    fflush(0);
}

static void test_list(int *list, size_t n, Shunter s)
{
    dump_list("Before:", list, n);
    (*s)(list, n);
    dump_list("After:", list, n);
}

static void list_of_tests(const FUT *f)
{
    int list1[] = { 1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5 };
    int list2[] = { 1, 2, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 0 };
    int list3[] = { 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 };
    int list4[] = { 0, 1 };
    int list5[] = { 0, 0 };
    int list6[] = { 0 };

    test_list(list1, DIM(list1), f->function);
    test_list(list2, DIM(list2), f->function);
    test_list(list3, DIM(list3), f->function);
    test_list(list4, DIM(list4), f->function);
    test_list(list5, DIM(list5), f->function);
    test_list(list6, DIM(list6), f->function);
}

static void test_timer(int *list, size_t n, const FUT *f)
{
    Clock t;
    clk_init(&t);
    clk_start(&t);
    f->function(list, n);
    clk_stop(&t);
    char buffer[32];
    printf("%-15s  %7zu  %10s\n", f->name, n, clk_elapsed_us(&t, buffer, sizeof(buffer)));
    fflush(0);
}

static void gen_test(size_t n, const FUT *f)
{
    int list[n];
    for (size_t i = 0; i < n/2; i += 2)
    {
        list[2*i+0] = i;
        list[2*i+1] = 0;
    }   
    test_timer(list, n, f);
}

static void timed_run(const FUT *f)
{
    printf("%s (%s)\n", f->name, f->author);
    if (cflag)
        list_of_tests(f);
    if (tflag)
    {
        for (size_t n = 100; n <= maxsize; n *= 10)
            gen_test(n, f);
    }
}

static const char optstr[] = "cm:n:t";
static const char usestr[] = "[-ct][-m maxsize][-n iterations]";

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    FUT functions[] =
    {
        { shunt_zeroes,   "shunt_zeroes:",   "Jonathan"    },   /* O(N) */
        { RemoveDead,     "RemoveDead:",     "Patrik"      },   /* O(N) */
        { pushbackzeros2, "pushbackzeros2:", "UmNyobe"     },   /* O(N) */
        { list_compact,   "list_compact:",   "Wildplasser" },   /* O(N) */
        { shufflezeroes,  "shufflezeroes:",  "Patrik"      },   /* O(N^2) */
        { pushbackzeros,  "pushbackzeros:",  "UmNyobe"     },   /* O(N^2) */
    };
    enum { NUM_FUNCTIONS = sizeof(functions)/sizeof(functions[0]) };
    int opt;
    int itercount = 2;

    while ((opt = getopt(argc, argv, optstr)) != -1)
    {
        switch (opt)
        {
        case 'c':
            cflag = 0;
            break;
        case 't':
            tflag = 0;
            break;
        case 'n':
            itercount = atoi(optarg);
            break;
        case 'm':
            maxsize = strtoull(optarg, 0, 0);
            break;
        default:
            fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s %s\n", argv[0], usestr);
            return(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < itercount; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < NUM_FUNCTIONS; j++)
            timed_run(&functions[j]);
        if (tflag == 0)
            break;
        cflag = 0;  /* Don't check on subsequent iterations */
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot, you were right. The issue with my algorithm is j = nextNonZero(list,i, n); or even j = nextNonZero(list,j, n);. It should be j = nextNonZero(list,MAX(i,j), n); –  UmNyobe Sep 21 '12 at 13:21
    
kudos btw. Now you can try to test again. –  UmNyobe Sep 21 '12 at 13:30
    
I think the implementations that rely on memmove() should perform better if longer stretches of used/unused cells would be present in the test set. The break-even point will probably be at about the size of a cache slot. Nice test bed, though. –  wildplasser Sep 22 '12 at 15:52

I think the following code is better. And it preserve the ordering of non-zeros elements

int nextZero(int* list, int start, int n){
   int i = start;
   while(i < n && list[i])
        i++;
   return i;
}

int nextNonZero(int* list, int start, int n){
   int i = start;
   while(i < n && !list[i])
        i++;
   return i;
}

void pushbackzeros(int* list, int n){
    int i = 0;
    int j = 0;
    while(i < n && j < n){
         i = nextZero(list,i, n);
         j = nextNonZero(list,i, n);
         if(i >= n || j >=n)
             return;
         list[i] = list[j];
         list[j] = 0;
    }
}

The idea:

  • You find the first zero position (i)
  • You find the next non-zero position(j)
  • you swap if the ordering is incorrect
  • You start again from your current position (or find a new non zero element for swap)

The complexity: O(n). In worst case, each index is visited at most 4 times (once by i, once by j in functions) and then during the swap.

EDITED: The previous code was broken. This one is still O(n), and modular.

EDIT:

The complexity of the code above is O(n^2) because index j can "go back" to look for non zero items, ie examine items it already has. It occurs when the next zero is before the next non-zero. The fix is rather simple,

  j = nextNonZero(list,MAX(i,j), n);

rather than

  j = nextNonZero(list,i, n);
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting idea, but I had to post a conceptual snippet of my code. In the actual code, l is an array of structs and each element has a size of 64 bytes –  Patrik Sep 20 '12 at 15:48
    
you can still adapt this code. you just need to define what is your zero structure and change the tests. –  UmNyobe Sep 20 '12 at 15:52
    
The functions nextZero() and nextNonZero() are each O(N); they're called inside a loop that is O(N); the algorithmic complexity is O(N^2). –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 20 '12 at 16:51
1  
It is O(n). your code above work roughly the same way as mine. Only difference is that I read an array position twice, once in nextZero and once in nextNonZero while you read once. If you still affirm my code is O(n^2) then yours is. –  UmNyobe Sep 20 '12 at 17:04
1  
UmNyobe is correct; nextZero and nextNonZero both do N/k iterations in each iteration of the loop, while the loop itself does k iterations, resulting in N iterations overall. –  Argeman Sep 21 '12 at 9:44

Here is my attempt. The return value is the number of members present in the array (anything after it has to be ignored !!):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

size_t list_compact(int *arr, size_t cnt);

size_t list_compact(int *arr, size_t cnt)
{
    size_t dst,src,pos;

    /* Skip leading filled area; find start of blanks */
    for (pos=0; pos < cnt; pos++) {
        if ( !arr[pos] ) break;
        }
    if (pos == cnt) return pos;

    for(dst= pos; ++pos < cnt; ) { 
        /* Skip blanks; find start of filled area */
        if ( !arr[pos] ) continue;

        /* Find end of filled area */
        for(src = pos; ++pos < cnt; ) {
            if ( !arr[pos] ) break;
            }   
        if (pos > src) {
            memcpy(arr+dst, arr+src, (pos-src) * sizeof arr[0] );
            dst += pos-src;
            }   
        }
#if MAINTAIN_ORIGINAL_API || JONATHAN_LEFFLFER
     if (cnt > src) memset( arr + src, 0, (cnt-src) * sizeof arr[0] );
#endif
    return dst;
}

UPDATE: here is a compact version of the Jonathan Leffler shuffle method (which does not maintain the original order):

size_t list_compact(int *arr, size_t cnt)
{
    int *beg,*end;
    if (!cnt) return 0;

    for (beg = arr, end=arr+cnt-1; beg <= end; ) {
        if ( *beg ) { beg++; continue; }
        if ( !*end ) { end--; continue; }
        *beg++ = *end--;
        }

#if WANT_ZERO_THE_TAIL
        if (beg < arr+cnt) memset(beg, 0, (arr+cnt-beg) *sizeof *arr);
        return cnt;
#else
    return beg - arr;
#endif
}

Update: (thanks to Jonathan Leffler) The memmove() should really have been memcpy(), since it is impossible for the buffers to overlap.

GCC 4.6.1 needs -minline-all-stringops to inline memcpy(). memmove() is never inlined, so it seems.

The inlining is a performance win, since the function call overhead is very big in relation to the actual amount being moved (only sizeof(int))

share|improve this answer
    
Using my first two test cases, your algorithm gives me: Before: 1 0 2 0 3 0 4 0 5 After: 1 2 3 4 5 0 4 0 5 and Before: 1 2 2 0 3 0 4 0 0 After: 1 2 2 3 4 0 4 0 0. As you can see, there seems to be a problem with something not being zeroed. The algorithm is O(N), though. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 21 '12 at 13:43
    
I had to do a bit of violence to your interface to fit it into my test harness cleanly — as you've duly noted. I don't think it would be hard to modify my algorithm to report the number of non-zero elements at the start of the result array, as your does, and it is certainly a good idea for the function to do that since it is hard-won knowledge. And it should be both sufficient and more efficient not to actually replace the zeroes at the end if the operational (compacted) size is duly reported. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 22 '12 at 16:06
    
Yep that is what my latest snippet does. BTW in your original program, you are swapping the value with a value known to be zero. Instead of list[tail] = t;, you could just as well do list[tail] = 0;, and omit the t temp + its initialiser. –  wildplasser Sep 22 '12 at 16:15
    
BTW: I was suprised to see that memmove() was not inlined by gcc. The function call overhead is definitely too large if the actual work is moving only one char. If it had been inlined, there would probably not heve been much difference between the methods (although the register pressure might become too high in that case) –  wildplasser Sep 22 '12 at 16:23
    
Try memcpy() instead? While you swapping disjoint elements of an array, you're OK with memcpy() instead of memmove(), but I use memmove() habitually because it won't ever bite me. I agree that swapping 0 integers is unnecessary. However, given that the use of integers is stated in the question to be a simplification for 64-byte structures, there is a decent chance that the swap is necessary in the real application. And the key point remains that the original quadratic algorithm is sub-optimal compared with any linear algorithm. (And I don't think any of this comment is controversial.) –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 22 '12 at 16:31

A ridiculously simple O(n) algorithm is to traverse the list, every time you encounter a zero entry delete it, record the number M of entries that you delete during this process, and when you're done traversing the list just add that number M of zero entries on the end of the list.

This requires N checks of consecutive elements, where N is the length of the list, M deletes, and M inserts on the end of the list. Worst-case scenario if the entire list is filled with zero entries you will perform N reads, N deletes, and N inserts.

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