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I have a comma delimited file. The lines look like this...

1,2,3,4,5
6,7,8
9,10
11,12,13,14,15

I need to have exactly 5 columns across all lines. So the new file will be...

1,2,3,4,5
6,7,8,,
9,10,,,
11,12,13,14,15

In other words, if there are less than 4 commas in a line. add required number to the end. I was told that there is python module that will do exactly the same. Where can I find such module? Is awk better suited for such type of tasks?

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Don't reask questions if you don't get an answer please –  Minion91 Sep 20 '12 at 15:22
    
The module is csv, although you'll probably need to pad the lists you read manually. –  Wooble Sep 20 '12 at 15:22
    
@Minion91 -- This isn't the same. previously OP just wanted to skip malformed files. This is asking about correcting them. –  mgilson Sep 20 '12 at 15:23
    
This is for some code challenge isn't it ? –  Minion91 Sep 20 '12 at 15:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The module you are looking for is the csv module. You'd still need to ensure that your lists meet you minimal length requirements:

with open('output.csv', 'wb') as output:
    input = csv.reader(open('faultyfile.csv', 'rb'))
    output = csv.writer(output, dialect=input.dialect)
    for line in input:
        if len(line) < 5:
            line.extend([''] * (5 - len(line)))
        output.writerow(line)
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If the data is pipe delimited | instead of , how to define it? Got it from the link. Thanks so much! –  shantanuo Sep 20 '12 at 15:54
    
If I use delimiter='^' while reading, it does not use the same delimiter while writing (extend)? Ok in python things just works if you try it. got it. –  shantanuo Sep 20 '12 at 16:01
    
the ouput csv.writer needs to be told what delimiter to use as well. I've updated the code slightly to configure the output csv.writer with the same dialect as the input reader. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 20 '12 at 16:03

If you don't mind using awk, then it is easy:

$ cat data.txt 
1,2,3,4,5
6,7,8
9,10
11,12,13,14,15

$ awk -F, 'BEGIN {OFS=","} {print $1,$2,$3,$4,$5}' data.txt 
1,2,3,4,5
6,7,8,,
9,10,,,
11,12,13,14,15
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awk has never stopped surprise me. –  shantanuo Sep 21 '12 at 2:09
with open('somefile.txt') as f:
      rows = []
      for line in f:
          rows.append(line.split(","))

max_cols = len(max(rows,key=len))
for row in rows:
    row.extend(['']*(max_cols-len(row))

print "\n".join(str(r) for r in rows)

If you are sure that it will always be n items long (in this case 5) and you will always know before opening the file ... it is more memory efficient to do (something like this)

 with open("f1","r"):
      with open("f2","w"):
          for line in f1:
              f2.write(line+(","*(4-line.count(",")))+"\n")
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1  
why read everything into memory before writing out again? You can easily do this line by line. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Sep 20 '12 at 15:27
    
well only cause he says its always five... this takes into account that there might be 6 or 7 in some file... –  Joran Beasley Sep 20 '12 at 15:27
    
Okay, good point. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 20 '12 at 15:28
    
also a good point by you ... assuming it is always 5 and you always know this before looking at the file :) –  Joran Beasley Sep 20 '12 at 15:29
1  
My final comment, print "\n".join([str(r) ... ]) -- You can omit the square brackets and just use a generator. –  mgilson Sep 20 '12 at 15:44
def correct_file(fname):
    with open(fname) as f:
         data = [ line[:-1]+(4-line.count(','))*',' + '\n' for line in f ]
    with open(fname,'w'):
         f.writelines(data)

As noted in the comments, this reads the entire file into memory when you really don't need to. To do it not all in one go:

import shutil
def correct_file(fname):
    with open(fname,'r') as fin, open('temp','w') as fout:
        for line in fin:
           new = line[:-1]+(4-line.count(','))*',' + '\n'
           fout.write(new)
    shutil.move('temp',fname)

This will make any file named temp disappear in the current directory. Of course, you can always use the tempfile module to get around that ...


And for the slightly more verbose, but bullet-proof (?) version:

import shutil
import tempfile
import atexit
import os

def try_delete(fname):
    try:
       os.unlink(fname)
    except OSError:
       if os.path.exists(fname):
          print "Couldn't delete existing file",fname

def correct_file(fname):
    with open(fname,'r') as fin, tempfile.NamedTemporaryFile('w',delete=False) as fout:
        atexit.register(lambda f=fout.name: try_delete(f)) #Need a closure here ...
        for line in fin:
           new = line[:-1]+(4-line.count(','))*',' + '\n'
           fout.write(new)
    shutil.move(fout.name,fname) #This should get rid of the temporary file ...
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why read everything into memory before writing out again? You can easily do this line by line. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Sep 20 '12 at 15:26
    
@MartijnPieters -- Not if you want to avoid a shutil.move to move the temporary file. I suppose you could use tempfile + shutil to create a temporary file safely and then move it, but if the file is small enough to fit into memory, why not just do it all in place? –  mgilson Sep 20 '12 at 15:27
    
And what would be the problem with that, really? How big are these files going to be? –  Martijn Pieters Sep 20 '12 at 15:29
    
@MartijnPieters -- No problem with it. It's just more complicated. –  mgilson Sep 20 '12 at 15:30
    
@MartijnPieters -- The other advantage to doing it all in memory is that if the process is interrupted halfway through reading, you're not left with a half processed file on your disk. I suppose that you could argue that if the process is interrupted halfway through writing, you've lost data ... –  mgilson Sep 20 '12 at 15:36

This might work for you (GNU sed):

 sed ':a;s/,/&/4;t;s/$/,/;ta' file
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