Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The other day, I came across an application that when you run it, it comes up with the UAC screen and requests to be run with administrator privileges. Clicking 'Yes' on the UAC screen runs the application like normal. The interesting thing is that if you click 'No', the application, instead of exiting, still runs, but runs in a limited user account (with less functionality, of course).

My question is, how can I configure my C# application to do this? I know my application can have an application manifest to run in elevated privileges, but how do I duplicate the kind of behavior I just explained above?

share|improve this question
    
The recommended method is to have a different application to run in elevated mode. The point is unelevated code should be separate from elevated code. Is that not possible? –  Peter Ritchie Sep 20 '12 at 16:18
    
e.g. run the "elevated" binary; if that fails, run the unelevated binary... –  Peter Ritchie Sep 20 '12 at 16:20
    
@PeterRitchie - I get what you are saying. But where does that logic go? The logic that says "Run this program if elevated, otherwise, run this program?" –  Icemanind Sep 20 '12 at 16:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To do this with a different elevated application you can use a "launcher" (or the launcher is the "normal" app).

If you wanted three applications you might have a WinForms launcher something like:

[STAThread]
static void Main()
{
    const int ERROR_CANCELLED = 1223;
    try
    {
        Process.Start("el.exe");
        // ran el in elevated node...
    }
    catch (Win32Exception ex)
    {
        if (ex.NativeErrorCode == ERROR_CANCELLED)
        {
            Process.Start("normal.exe");
        }
    }
}

If you were doing two applications, you could do something like:

[STAThread]
static void Main()
{
    const int ERROR_CANCELLED = 1223;
    try
    {
        Process.Start("el.exe");
        // ran el in elevated node...
    }
    catch (Win32Exception ex)
    {
        if (ex.NativeErrorCode == ERROR_CANCELLED)
        {
            // "continue" as un-elevated app.
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            Application.Run(new Form1());
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is no other way than to use a launcher app. –  Helge Klein Sep 20 '12 at 19:26
    
I was thinking there was something I could add to the app.manifest file to do this. Using a launcher though is probably the best way. Thanks Peter –  Icemanind Sep 20 '12 at 20:38
    
@icemanind the problem with the manifest (i.e. requires admin priv.) is that the app never runs if the user chooses "no". So, you don't have a chance to run code un-elevated... –  Peter Ritchie Sep 20 '12 at 20:58
    
@PeterRitchie That does make sense, except, the Operating System must read the manifest prior to launching the application because otherwise, how would it know that the application needs (or doesn't need) elevated privileges in the first place? –  Icemanind Sep 20 '12 at 22:15
    
Yep, it has to load it from the manifest first, but that doesn't means its loaded any code. Once it its elevated, then it runs the code –  Peter Ritchie Sep 20 '12 at 22:29

You can keep all the code in one application. The application manifest does not request the application to be run elevated, it uses asInvoker level.

When the application is started, it tries to re-start itself elevated. I mean it starts another process with runas verb. If it succeeds, then the first instance just exists.

If elevation was not successful, then it continues to run with limited functionality.


But think about the user experience:

Not everyone in the world works as administrator. For them, elevation would not look as clicking Continue button, the UAC will ask them to provide user name and password of an administrator.

From this point of view, Microsoft recommended approach works great: run as regular user until you really need to elevate. All elevation points should be clearly marked in the UI. You can still use the same exe file to run non-elevated and elevated instances, yet you must implement a communication mechanism so the non-elevated instance can provide all the data to perform the operation requested by the user. Once you started elevated instance, you can keep it running and exit the non-elevated one, so that other operations could be performed without elevation.

Thus it means more effort, but a much better user experience.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.