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I have a matrix in which I want to zero certain specific elements.

For instance, imagine that my matrix is:

m <- matrix(1:100, ncol=10)

I then have two vectors indicating which elements to keep

m.from <- c(2, 5, 4, 4, 6, 3, 1, 4, 2, 5)
m.to   <- c(7, 9, 6, 8, 9, 5, 6, 8, 4, 8)

So, for instance I will keep elements 3:6 in row 1, and set element 1:2 and 7:10 to 0. For line 2 I will keep 6:8 and zero the rest, and so on.

Now, I could easily do:

for (line in 1:nrow(m))
    {
    m[line, 1:m.from[line]] <- 0
    m[line, m.to[line]:ncol(m)] <- 0
    }

which gives the correct result.

In my specific case, however, I am operating on a ~15000 x 3000 matrix which makes using this kind of loop excruciatingly long.

How can I speed up this code? I though of using apply, but how do I access the correct index of m.from and m.to?

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I haven't thought it through completely, but I wonder if a fast solution could be had by attaching m.from and m.to as additional columns to your matrix. Then an apply solution would be trivial, and you might even be able to vectorize it. –  joran Sep 20 '12 at 16:07
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here's a simple matrix oriented solution:

m[col(m) <= m.from] <- 0
m[col(m) >= m.to] <- 0
m
      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10]
 [1,]    0    0   21   31   41   51    0    0    0     0
 [2,]    0    0    0    0    0   52   62   72    0     0
 [3,]    0    0    0    0   43    0    0    0    0     0
 [4,]    0    0    0    0   44   54   64    0    0     0
 [5,]    0    0    0    0    0    0   65   75    0     0
 [6,]    0    0    0   36    0    0    0    0    0     0
 [7,]    0   17   27   37   47    0    0    0    0     0
 [8,]    0    0    0    0   48   58   68    0    0     0
 [9,]    0    0   29    0    0    0    0    0    0     0
[10,]    0    0    0    0    0   60   70    0    0     0

(I think I might win the R Golf prize on this one , too.) For which my entry would be:

m[col(m)<=m.from|col(m)>= m.to]<-0 
share|improve this answer
    
Double bogey!! Try z=col(m);m[z<=m.from|z>=m.to]=0. I encourage R enthusiasts to give this a try: codegolf.stackexchange.com/questions. R has potential for short answers, but is not always well voted. –  flodel Sep 21 '12 at 0:40
    
Joke aside about the code golf, your answer to the question is VERY elegant. You got my vote. –  flodel Sep 21 '12 at 0:55
    
You can actually do that? Wow, I was not expecting all of these variants. –  nico Sep 21 '12 at 6:28
    
You got my vote too! –  Jilber Sep 21 '12 at 9:44
    
Simple, expressive, awesome. –  Josh O'Brien Sep 22 '12 at 17:33
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The best solution will be one that pre-calculates all of the indices to be replaced, and then replaces them with a single assignment operation.

Since R stores matrices in column-major order, I find it easier to think about sequences of elements to be replaced in a transposed version of your matrix. That's what I've used below. If, however, the two calls to t() are too costly, I'm sure you can figure out a clever way to calculate the indices of the untransposed matrix -- perhaps using a two column matrix containing row and column indices.

## Your example
m <- matrix(1:100, ncol=10)
m.from <- c(2, 5, 4, 4, 6, 3, 1, 4, 2, 5)
m.to   <- c(7, 9, 6, 8, 9, 5, 6, 8, 4, 8)

## Let's work with a transposed version of your matrix
tm <- t(m)

## Calculate indices of cells to be replaced
i <- (seq_len(ncol(tm)) - 1) * nrow(tm)
m.to   <- c(1, m.to + i)
m.from <- c(m.from + i, length(m))
ii <- unlist(mapply(seq, from = m.to, to = m.from))

## Perform replacement and transpose back results
tm[ii] <- 0
m <- t(tm)
#       [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10]
#  [1,]    0    0   21   31   41   51    0    0    0     0
#  [2,]    0    0    0    0    0   52   62   72    0     0
#  [3,]    0    0    0    0   43    0    0    0    0     0
#  [4,]    0    0    0    0   44   54   64    0    0     0
#  [5,]    0    0    0    0    0    0   65   75    0     0
#  [6,]    0    0    0   36    0    0    0    0    0     0
#  [7,]    0   17   27   37   47    0    0    0    0     0
#  [8,]    0    0    0    0   48   58   68    0    0     0
#  [9,]    0    0   29    0    0    0    0    0    0     0
# [10,]    0    0    0    0    0   60   70    0    0     0
share|improve this answer
    
This looks very interesting indeed... I am going to try it and I will let you know! –  nico Sep 20 '12 at 16:37
    
Beautiful! It is extremely fast even with a big matrix! –  nico Sep 20 '12 at 16:57
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A sapply version.

m <- matrix(1:100, ncol=10)
m.from <- c(2, 5, 4, 4, 6, 3, 1, 4, 2, 5)
m.to   <- c(7, 9, 6, 8, 9, 5, 6, 8, 4, 8)

t(sapply(1:nrow(m), function(i) replace(m[i,], c(1:m.from[i], m.to[i]:ncol(m)), 0 )))   



     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10]
 [1,]    0    0   21   31   41   51    0    0    0     0
 [2,]    0    0    0    0    0   52   62   72    0     0
 [3,]    0    0    0    0   43    0    0    0    0     0
 [4,]    0    0    0    0   44   54   64    0    0     0
 [5,]    0    0    0    0    0    0   65   75    0     0
 [6,]    0    0    0   36    0    0    0    0    0     0
 [7,]    0   17   27   37   47    0    0    0    0     0
 [8,]    0    0    0    0   48   58   68    0    0     0
 [9,]    0    0   29    0    0    0    0    0    0     0
[10,]    0    0    0    0    0   60   70    0    0     0

Elapsed time not tested yet

share|improve this answer
    
Nice one! This is even faster than the other solution. –  nico Sep 20 '12 at 17:46
    
Very interesting. Good to know that sapply is so well optimized for this sort of thing. –  Josh O'Brien Sep 20 '12 at 18:53
    
@JoshO'Brien: I guess the problem in the previous solution is that you have m, its transposed and ii and with a big matrix that takes up a lot of memory. –  nico Sep 20 '12 at 19:28
    
@nico -- Yep, transposition can take a long time. Since Jilber's solution still requires one call to t(), I've supplied a second answer that requires no transpositions. I'll be very interested to know whether it provides any further speedup... –  Josh O'Brien Sep 20 '12 at 20:53
    
@Josh O'Brien: I do not have the data here at home, I will try tomorrow at work and let you know –  nico Sep 20 '12 at 21:49
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This option constructs a two-column matrix indexing elements to be replaced, and requires no matrix transpositions, so should be hard to beat, speedwise

## Your data
m <- matrix(1:100, ncol=10)
m.from <- c(2, 5, 4, 4, 6, 3, 1, 4, 2, 5)
m.to   <- c(7, 9, 6, 8, 9, 5, 6, 8, 4, 8)

## Construct a two column matrix with row (ii) and column (jj) indices
## of cells to be replaced
ii <- rep.int(1:ncol(m), times = (m.from + (ncol(m) - m.to + 1)))
jj <- mapply(seq, from = m.from + 1, to = m.to - 1)
jj <- unlist(sapply(jj, function(X) setdiff(1:10,X)))
ij <- cbind(ii, jj)

## Replace cells
m[ij] <- 0
#       [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10]
#  [1,]    0    0   21   31   41   51    0    0    0     0
#  [2,]    0    0    0    0    0   52   62   72    0     0
#  [3,]    0    0    0    0   43    0    0    0    0     0
#  [4,]    0    0    0    0   44   54   64    0    0     0
#  [5,]    0    0    0    0    0    0   65   75    0     0
#  [6,]    0    0    0   36    0    0    0    0    0     0
#  [7,]    0   17   27   37   47    0    0    0    0     0
#  [8,]    0    0    0    0   48   58   68    0    0     0
#  [9,]    0    0   29    0    0    0    0    0    0     0
# [10,]    0    0    0    0    0   60   70    0    0     0
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