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I have function f1 which must contain subfunctions, so I can't use another script:

function vars = f1()

    a = 1;
    b = 'hello';
    c = {[1 2 3]};

    currvars = whos;    %all variable info
    for k = 1:size(currvars, 1)
        eval(['vars.(currvars(k).name) = ' currvars(k).name ';']);
    end

end

I call the function in a script, and then I create the variables in the script using genvarname() and eval():

vars = f1();
varnames = genvarname(fieldnames(vars));
for k = 1:size(varnames(:),1)    %Creates vars with the struct's fieldnames.
    eval([varnames{k} ' = vars.' varnames{k} ';']);
end
clearvars vars varnames

I'd like to fit the variable creation process into a function somehow while reading out all the variables only to the script calling it, but I don't want to assign a hundred different variable names to the output. Does anyone have any advice on how to do this?

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2  
might be an idea to tag it with the language or mention it in the title. –  Paul Collingwood Sep 20 '12 at 15:46
    
my first question. thanks for the heads up paul! –  Jason Garcia Sep 20 '12 at 18:16

3 Answers 3

DON'T CREATE zillions of automatically named variables. This is foolish and terribly poor programming style. Instead, learn to use arrays. Multidimensional arrays, cell arrays, struct arrays.

Or, do what you have done, and then be forced to find a kludge like you are looking for.

Take your pick. Eval is evil.

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I need to do this because I'm editing old 2004 code that already has these varialbes assigned and is just a wall of text. I'm trying to clean it up a little at a time. If anyone has comments that are constructive, please reply. –  Jason Garcia Sep 20 '12 at 19:07
1  
@JasonGarcia : I am inclined to agree with woodchips here. By taking this variable-generation approach you will very likely cause more headache for yourself in the future. If your situation really requires this kind of approach, please explain more clearly in the original question what you are trying to do and why this approach is obligatory. –  cjh Sep 20 '12 at 19:53
    
This request is needed because I'm dealing with spaghetti code. There are numerous scripts that call even more scripts. I'm trying to narrow down which variables are defined where and categorize the code into functions. I can't eliminate variable names until i know where they are used. I wanted to create the functions first to possibly make the clean-up easier. I also agree that arrays are easier to interpret, but the fact of the matter is the code was already written. –  Jason Garcia Sep 20 '12 at 20:07
    
Still ... Use a struct or a cell array. To be honest, you will likely be better off re-writing large pieces of spaghetti code completely, than wasting your time to untangle crap spaghetti. Working with that code will simply create bugs you cannot then repair without a huge further investment. In the end, the time spent writing something good will be well worth it. –  user85109 Sep 20 '12 at 20:16
2  
With all due respect, just deciding to rewrite code that was developed over the span of five years doesn't get decided over a forum. I agree with the opinion that this is a kludge, but I'd really appreciate any ideas as to how to resolve my question. –  Jason Garcia Sep 20 '12 at 20:37

You could return a structure with "corrected" fieldnames:

function output = someFunc

    vars = f1();

    protected = { %# some list of varnames you don't want
    };

    names    = fieldnames(vars);
    newnames = genvarname(names, protected);

    for k = 1:numel(newnames)
        output.(newnames{k}) = vars.(names{k});            
    end

end

If you then use

output = someFunc;
varnames = fieldnames(output);
for k = 1:numel(fieldnames)
    eval([varnames{k} ' = output.' varnames{k} ';']);
end

in the script/function where you want the variable names, you have a relatively clean way of locking everything up in the function someFunc without having to pre-define all output variable names.

You can also do this in one step:

function someFunc2

    vars = f1();

    protected = { %# some list of varnames you don't want
    };

    names    = fieldnames(vars);
    newnames = genvarname(names, protected);

    for k = 1:numel(newnames)
        assignin('caller', newnames{k}, vars.(names{k}));
    end

end

Which means you just call the function

someFunc2;

in your script, and the function then defines and assigns all the variables in the script's workspace.

A tiny step forward, but forward nonetheless :)

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I think the problem is that he needs the variables to be available in the workspace, since they are used by other parts of his code. Having a structure would then require extracting the structure fields and assigning them to actual variables, so that the code works. –  angainor Sep 21 '12 at 7:47
    
@angainor: Yes, I see your point. I've edited my post to reflect it. –  Rody Oldenhuis Sep 21 '12 at 8:24
    
@Rody: That is sweetness! –  Jason Garcia Sep 21 '12 at 12:41
up vote 0 down vote accepted

CREDIT TO RODY...

#Old semi-"global" variables:

function vars = f1()

    a = 1;
    b = 'hello';
    c = {[1 2 3]};
    currvars = whos;    %all variable info
    for k = 1:size(currvars, 1)
       eval(['vars.(currvars(k).name) = ' currvars(k).name ';']);
    end

end

#Function to assign variables to the calling script's/function's workspace. Variable names are determined by the single structure's fieldnames:
function setvars(func)

    vars = func;
    protected = {'If needed, put variable names you do not want here'};
    names    = fieldnames(vars);
    newnames = genvarname(names, protected);
    for k = 1:numel(newnames)
        assignin('caller', newnames{k}, vars.(names{k}));
    end

end

#Script call:

setvars(f1);
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