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I know that there are a brazillion examples of LINQ nested queries here on SO and elsewhere, but it just isn't making sense to me. If someone could explain this like I'm five, I'd be very appreciative. This is all pseudo-obfuscated, so please be patient with this contrived example.

I have a EF model that has these:

public class Car(){
  public String Vin {get; private set;}
  public string Type {get; private set;}
  public List<Option> Options {get; set;}
}

public class Option(){
  public string Name { get; set; }
}

and I get the collection of IQueryable<Car> cars from the repository.

Simple enough. The goal is:

  1. List all of the car Types (say "truck", "suv", "minivan" etc)
  2. Under each of these Types, have a sub-list of Option Names that exist on cars of that Type.
  3. Under each Option, list the VIN of each car that has that option and is of that Type.

so the list would look like:

  • Truck
    • Trailer Hitch
      • vin1
      • vin8
    • Truck Nuts
      • vin2
      • vin3
      • vin4
    • Gun Rack
      • vin1
    • Folding Rear Seat
      • vin2
      • vin3
  • Minivan
    • Swivel Seats
      • vin6
    • Dvd Player
      • vin6
      • vin10
    • Folding Rear Seat
      • vin6
      • vin10
  • Suv
    • Folding Rear Seat
      • vin9
      • vin5

You probably get the idea. I know that I can group cars by Type, like this:

from c in cars
group by c.Type into g

but I think what I need to do is group Vin into Option and group that result into Type. I also think I might need to

cars.SelectMany(c => c.Options)
    .Select(o => o.Name)
    .Distinct();

to get a list of unique option Names, but I not sure that a) this is the most efficient way to do this and b) how to incorporate this into my grouping query. I don't really understand how to write a nested grouping query to accomplish this - is the first group the outer group or the inner group?

My understanding of this is below remedial, so please, once again: explain like I'm five.

Thanks to all.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's surely not a trivial query.

I would do it something like this:

cars.SelectMany(c => c.Options.Select(o => new { Car = c, Option = o.Name }))
    .GroupBy(x => x.Car.Type)
    .Select(x => new
                 {
                     Type = x.Key,
                     Options = x.GroupBy(y => y.Option, y => y.Car.Vin)
                                .Select(y => new { Option = y.Key,
                                                   Cars = y.ToList() } )
                 });

This query does the following:

  1. We change the data we work on a little bit to be easier to handle: You want to have the options above the cars. That means that the end result will have each car possibly under multiple options, so what we really need is a list of (Option, Car) tuples.

    We achieve this with

    cars.SelectMany(c => c.Options.Select(o => new { Car = c, Option = o.Name }))
    

    This basically says: For each car and each option select a new anonymous type with the car and the option name as properties. Let's name that anonymous type Ano1.

    The result will be an IEnumerable<Ano1>.

  2. This flat data is now grouped by the car type. This means that for each car type we have a list of Ano1 instances. So we now have a list of groups with each group having a list of Ano1 instances.

  3. On this list of groups we issue a select. For each group (= car type) the select returns a new anonymous type with a property for the car type - so that information is not lost - and a property for the options.

  4. The options from the previous step will eventually be a list of anonymous types with the properties Option and Cars. To get this data, we group all the Ano1 instances for our by the Option and select the VIN of the car as the element inside the group. These groups are now transformed into a new anonymous type with a property for the option name and a property for the cars.

The query is not trivial and so is the explanation. Please ask if something is not clear.

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While I appreciate this answer, could you break down what it's doing, and your thought process to arrive at this answer? I am looking for understanding as well as the solution. –  ScottSEA Sep 20 '12 at 16:10
    
@ScottSEA: please see update –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 20 '12 at 16:58
    
I am truly on the road to understanding. Thanks. –  ScottSEA Sep 20 '12 at 17:06
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This isnt going to be pretty, and im not sure L2E will handle this, you might need to select the entire list from the database and do this in L2O:

var result = cars.GroupBy(c => c.Type)
            .Select(c => new {
               Type = c.Key,
               Options = c.SelectMany(x => x.Options)
                           .GroupBy(x => x.Name)
                           .Select(x => new {
                                  Option = x.Key ,
                                  Vins = c.Where(y => y.Options.Any(z => z.Name == x.Key)).Select(z => z.Vin)
                           })
            });

Live example (Just the trucks modelled, but will work for all): http://rextester.com/OGD12123

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This linq-to-entities query will do the trick

var query = from c in cars
            group c by c.Type into g
            select new {
              Type = g.Key,
              Options = from o in g.Options.SelectMany(x => x.Options).Distinct()
                        select new {
                          o.Name,
                          Vins = from c in cars
                                 where c.Options.Any(x => x.Name == o.Name)
                                 where c.Type == g.Key
                                 select c.Vin
                        }
            }
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1  
While I appreciate this answer, could you break down what it's doing, and your thought process to arrive at this answer? I am looking for understanding as well as the solution. –  ScottSEA Sep 20 '12 at 16:10
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