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I've been looking at a few signal/slot implementations, and with no exception they were pretty complicated, some even relying on MOC and extra code generation, like those of Qt.

I realize there are concerns such as threat safety and whatnot, but for a simple, single threaded scenario, is there something wrong with going for a simple approach, something like:

typedef void (*fPtr)();

class GenericButton
{
public:
    GenericButton() : funcitonToCall(nullptr) {}
    void setTarget(fPtr target) {
        funcitonToCall = target;
    }

    void pressButton() {
        if (funcitonToCall) funcitonToCall();
    }

private:
    fPtr funcitonToCall;
};

void doSomething(){
    std::cout << "doing something..." << std::endl;
}

void doSomethingElse(){
    std::cout << "doing something else..." << std::endl;
}

int main(){
    GenericButton myButton;
    myButton.setTarget(doSomething);
    myButton.pressButton();
    myButton.setTarget(doSomethingElse);
    myButton.pressButton();
}

It is still possible to chain several other methods and pass data in the target void function. So why all the complexity for something as trivial as executing some code when a button gets clicked.

share|improve this question
2  
I'd use std::function and std::bind (or boost alternatives) rather than function pointers. –  Flexo Sep 20 '12 at 15:49
    
I suppose so, I am still new to c++11 –  ddriver Sep 20 '12 at 15:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a perfectly sensible solution, but don't restrict yourself to just function pointers. Use std::function which allows you to bind things, call member functions on objects, use lambdas and still resort to a function pointer where it makes sense. Example:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

using namespace std::placeholders;


class GenericButton
{
public:
    typedef std::function<void()> fPtr;
    GenericButton() : funcitonToCall(nullptr) {}
    void setTarget(fPtr target) {
        funcitonToCall = target;
    }

    void pressButton() {
        if (funcitonToCall) funcitonToCall();
    }

private:
    fPtr funcitonToCall;
};

struct foo {
    void doSomething() const {
        std::cout << "doing something in a foo..." << std::endl;
    }

    static void alternative(int i) {
        std::cout << "And another, i=" << i << "\n";
    }
};

void doSomethingElse() {
    std::cout << "doing something else..." << std::endl;
}

int main() {
    GenericButton myButton;
    foo f;
    myButton.setTarget(std::bind(&foo::doSomething, &f));
    myButton.pressButton();
    myButton.setTarget(doSomethingElse);
    myButton.pressButton();
    myButton.setTarget(std::bind(foo::alternative, 666));
    myButton.pressButton();
    myButton.setTarget([](){ std::cout << "Lambda!\n"; });
    myButton.pressButton();
}

There's almost always a better solution in C++ than function pointers.

If you don't have std::function/std::bind there's always alternatives in boost that work and you can roll your own std::function alternative without too much work which would be worth doing if you want to make something like this.

Most of the signal/slot mechanisms that are around date from a time when things like boost::bind was not a viable option. Those days are long gone and you can get something standard and more flexible for little more complexity than just a function pointer.

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That is all nice, but I was asking about the downsides of using such a simple approach compared to those other overly complicated many thousands of LOC signal/slot implementations. –  ddriver Sep 20 '12 at 15:58
    
@ddriver - I slightly skipped over my point there - standard tools are more flexible and powerful than complex things like Qt's signal/slot mechanism. You can skip thousands of LOC tools and leave all the heavy lifting to something which is standard, portable and barely more than a function pointer to use. So yes a simplified mechanism makes a lot of sense, but raw function pointers aren't really the tool to do it with. –  Flexo Sep 20 '12 at 16:00
    
I mostly used the raw function pointer because originally I asked about both C and C++, and C was edited out probably because I used a class instead of a struct. And C++11 features are not really available in C :) Anyway, std::bind is surely useful to get to any function with that signature, including a class member method of a particular instance. –  ddriver Sep 20 '12 at 16:07

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