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here is some code i have which is really ugly i am hoping someone can show me how to make it better. i vaguely know how to fix this code but can't get any improvements to work in practice.

list1 = ([1, 10])
array2 = numpy.ones((1,3))
array3=numpy.ones((1,2))

conn = sqlite3.connect("a.db")
c = conn.cursor()
c.execute("insert into a_table values(?, ? , ?, ?, ?, ?, ?)", (list1[0], list1[1], array2[0][0], array2[0][1], array2[0][2], array3[0][0], array3[0][1]))
#

what i think i need to do is append list1, array2 and array3 into a list and then flatten it somehow. and then unpack the entire list into the table with one command somehow... thanks!!

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4 Answers 4

You could use ravel to make array2 and array3 1-dimensional:

In [149]: import itertools

In [150]: list(itertools.chain(list1, array2.ravel(), array3.ravel()))
Out[150]: [1, 10, 0, 1, 2, 0, 1]
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you can probably pass the chain generator directly to sqlite3 and not convert it to a list ... –  Joran Beasley Sep 20 '12 at 16:05
1  
You cannot pass the generator straight into sqlite3. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 20 '12 at 16:15
1  
ravel() creates a new array. Why not use the iterator flat? list(itertools.chain(list1, array2.flat, array3.flat)) –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 20 '12 at 16:36
1  
@StevenRumbalski: ravel does not create a new array in this case. (I think it only create a copy if you change the order from C to F or vice versa.) Though you are right flat would have been just as good. –  unutbu Sep 20 '12 at 16:49
    
@unutbu: Yes. I should have read the docs for ravel more closely: "A copy is made only if needed." –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 20 '12 at 16:57

Just built a new list by casting the arrays to single-dimension lists:

c.execute("insert into a_table values(?, ? , ?, ?, ?, ?, ?)", 
    list1 + list(array2[0]) + list(array3[0]))            

Alternatively, you could use .ravel() to create one-dimensional arrays:

c.execute("insert into a_table values(?, ? , ?, ?, ?, ?, ?)", 
    list1 + list(array2.ravel()) + list(array3.ravel()))            

If the number of parameters is variable, you can generate the placeholder parameters too:

from itertools import chain
params = list(chain(list1, array2.ravel(), array3.ravel()))

c.execute("insert into a_table values(%s)" % (', '.join(('?',) * len(params),),
    params)
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1  
Maybe use array2.ravel() etc. so that the arrays can be any shape. –  mgilson Sep 20 '12 at 16:01
    
Does sqlite3 accept an iterator? If so itertools.chain could work here. –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 20 '12 at 16:03
    
@StevenRumbalski: it doesn't, unfortunately. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 20 '12 at 16:10
    
is there a way to do this without putting in the question marks? my table has many columns so it is burdensome for me to write in each question mark... –  appleLover Sep 22 '12 at 2:10
    
@appleLover: You can generate the placeholders to match the number of parameters; answer updated. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 22 '12 at 6:12
>>> from itertools import chain
>>> master_l = list(array2)+list(array3)
>>> list1.extend(chain(*master_l)
... )
>>> list1
[1, 10, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0]

>>> c.execute("insert into a_table values(?, ? , ?, ?, ?, ?, ?)",list1)
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I think, if you're not doing this in a loop, itertools.chain() doesn't gain you anything. Here's something simple based on your input:

list1=([1,10])
array2 = numpy.ones((1,3))
array3 = numpy.ones((1,2))

args=list1 + list(*array2) + list(*array3)
# [1, 10, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0]
conn = sqlite3.connect("a.db")
c = conn.cursor()
c.execute("insert into a_table values(?, ? , ?, ?, ?, ?, ?)",*args)
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