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I'm working on an existing C# program that queries and makes changes to various resources outside of the program and computer that the program is run on. The program works on most computers but randomly fails on random computers every so often. When this happens we have no feedback as to why other than what the user tells us about the exception that was thrown up on the screen that they may or may not have already cleared. Even if they leave it up on the screen for us it provides little to no useful information to us. I have since modified the program to log particular events and gathered information to a text file that I can use to approximate where the program stopped. This is at least a start but from reading many threads on stackoverflow.com as well as other forums I know that the program needs to at least make an attempt to handle the specific exceptions that could come up when querying and modifying LDAP, DS, DNS, SQL and so on.

Currently there is just big try blocks surrounding all of the to do code with just one catch block at the end of each.

private void method_name()
{
    try
    {
       //many lines of to do code calling many other methods
    }
    catch (exception ex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("An Error has occurred in method_name() :" + ex.Message);
    }

My first thought was to nest more specific try/catch blocks within the larger try blocks but I keep running into problems with variables becoming unreachable in different contexts. for example

try
{
   LdapConnection ldapConn = new LdapConnection();
   ldapConn.Connect(details of connection);
   ldapConn.Bind(details of bind statement);
   LdapSearchQueue queue = ldapConn.Search(search criteria and such);
   LdapMessage message;
}
catch (somesortofexception ex)
{
   //do something sensible about it
}

while ((message = queue.getResponse()) != null)
{
   //do things with message
}
ldapConn.Disconnect();

the problem being that message and queue are unreachable outside of the try block. This is just one example of something done withing the "//many lines of to do code calling many other methods" that I'm trying to work with.

So here are my questions:

Would it be better to try and make the try block bigger in the above example to include the while loop and ldap disconnect or to just leave the big try loop, make a list of things that happen during that and create many catch blocks at the end to catch specific exceptions? I feel like putting in the smaller try blocks around specific code is the way to go based on what I've read on this site.

Should I use the smaller try blocks like I've been trying to implement, would be be okay to just use a catch block that catches any exception raised within that small snippet of code and log it to my log file or should I try and catch specific exceptions? I don't really have anything different I can do with those exceptions other than log them to the file anyways.

Do I need to throw the exceptions? I don't really want anything bubbling up to the user other than a message in plain english saying that something went wrong and to contact IT. Currently none of the catch blocks throw anything.

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What type of application is this? Winforms? Console? –  McGarnagle Sep 20 '12 at 16:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

About breaking down exceptions, I would always separate the connection code from the query one.

So this would become:

LdapConnection ldapConn = new LdapConnection();
try
{
   ldapConn.Connect(details of connection);
   ldapConn.Bind(details of bind statement);
}
catch (somesortofexception ex)
{
   //Log, send error message..
   ldapConn = null;
}

if (ldapConn != null)
{
    try
    {
         //Do what you need with your connection
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
         //Log, Error....
    }
    finally
    {
        //Disconnect your ldap here
    }
}

Ideally i would put all the connection code and search code in separate methods as well, so you'll have some nicer stack trace.

About error message I would also just use some generic message and log exception specifics into some kind of file ( http://logging.apache.org/log4net/ ) is quite nice for having nicely formatted log files.

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if something went wrong with the bind statement, will ldapConn.Disconnect() also throw an exception? –  GC78 Sep 21 '12 at 12:42
    
As far as I know, if something goes wrong with bind, you should still be connected, so disconnect should be safe to call. You can easily try by providing invalid credentials when calling bind. –  catflier Sep 21 '12 at 13:05
    
This has been very helpful so far. Just a couple more things: –  GC78 Sep 21 '12 at 13:54
    
This has been very helpful so far. Just a couple more things: If I set ldapConn = null; at the beginning before the try block then it gets the exception "Object reference not set to an instance of an object." I can avoid this by only putting the constructor before the try and not set it to null. I don't know if that is bad practice or not but it works..... the other thing is I want to make sure to run ldapConn.Disconnect() but I want my catch loop to log the error and halt the program which would stop the finally block from running. should I put another ldapconn.Disconnect in the catch block? –  GC78 Sep 21 '12 at 14:01
    
ok, so i just re-read your code and noticed that you didn't have ldapConn = null; before the first try statement anyways. I don't know where I got that from. –  GC78 Sep 21 '12 at 14:08

A local catch block that swallows a specific exception is fine as long as you're expecting that exception and it can be handled locally. In this case you can provide information to the user based only on what the exception contains, or you can move the variable definitions above the try block if you want to include their state in the logging and/or message.

For exceptions that you're not expecting, you should let them bubble upwards to the top of the call stack where they can be logged by a global handler before exiting the program gracefully. You don't want to potentially nail the corpse in an upright position by swallowing these exceptions.

Assuming this is a WinForms app, the setup of global handlers looks something like this:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    // Switch-off the Windows Forms default handler for unhandled exceptions.
    // NB From .NET 4 upwards, this won't work if the process state is corrupted.
    Application.SetUnhandledExceptionMode(UnhandledExceptionMode.CatchException);

    // Setup event handler to intercept an unhandled exception on a UI thread.
    // NB The exception will still terminate the application. 
    // But you can show a MessageBox and/or log the exception. 
    Application.ThreadException += 
        new ThreadExceptionEventHandler(App_UiThreadException);

    // Setup event handler to intercept unhandled exception on a non-UI thread.
    AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += new 
        UnhandledExceptionEventHandler(App_NonUiThreadException);

    // Run the application (open main form etc).    
}
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