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I am trying to create an autocomplete textfield for selecting a Mercurial revision (full node id). I can use hg log --template '{node}\n' to get all revisions, but it takes over 1s for that command to complete.

When the user starts typing (say 1d34, for instance) in the textfield, I want to do something like hg log --rev 1d34 --template '{node}\n' so that the resulting list is all revisions beginning with 1d34. Unfortunately, Mercurial gives an error (ambiguous identifier!) if more than one revision matches the identifier.

Filtering the list takes too long since the hg log command has to complete first, so I'm looking for a quicker solution. I could cache the list, but the repository gets changed often so I keep coming back to the slow hg log command.

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Does it make any difference if you only get the log from current tip to the most recently retrieved one? Unless you're rewriting history, new changesets won't invalidate your cache up to that point. –  shambulator Sep 20 '12 at 23:26
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Following @shambulator, you can just update your cache instead of regenerating it from scratch every time. Mercurial's revlog format is well suited to such sequential operations, especially ones indexed from either the tip or the initial commit.

If you're not rewriting history, you can just do

hg log --template '{node}\n' --rev lastcached:tip

(You could potentially use bookmarks or tags to track the last cached revision, but this would have the disadvantage of adding data to the repo visible to users of vanilla Mercurial or other GUIs.)

If you're rewriting history, then you can either do a full refresh afterwards, or you can track the last unchanged revision. Then you delete all revisions following that one in your cache and do

hg log --template '{node}\n' --rev lastunchanged:tip

(And of course update lastcached to reflect the new history.)

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