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I wanted to write a program that adds two Numbers and show the result in Decimal form, initially it was looking a piece of cake but as it turned out, it wasn't !!! because there is just 0-9 characters in decimal and when we want to add any number greater than those we've to perform some mathematics,

Here is what i've done, I wanted to add two numbers 35 and 39,

35 + 39 = 74

MOV BL,35H
MOV AL,39H
ADD AL,BL

DAA ;Decimal after Addition => the result of it would be 0074H


PUSH AX     ;PRESERVE 0074H

; Separating the two numbers

AND AL,00001111B ; AL => 0000 0100 
ADD AL,30H       ; ; AL => 0004H + 30H = 4 of Decimal

POP AX ;AX = 74H => 01110100

ROR AL,1
ROR AL,1
ROR AL,1
ROR AL,1

AND AL,00001111B ;AL => 0000 0111
ADD Al,30H       ;A: => 0007H + 30H = 7 of Decimal
MOV DL,AL 



MOV AH,4CH ;Return Control to the DOS
INT 21H

I recovered both the numbers but now how to show the result as '74' ???

Also , this method is so time consuming, is there any better and more efficient way to do this ?

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1) you forget to store the first digit somewhere after calculation. –  Serge Sep 20 '12 at 18:07
    
even if i store how will i merge the two digits as a single result eventually ? –  Great mailz Sep 20 '12 at 18:10
    
it depends on what form you like to see it: as a string kept in memory or as two bytes value in a register. But how did you get to programming for 8086 running dos? –  Serge Sep 20 '12 at 18:15
1  
can you tell me both ways ? and i am using TASM with DosBox in Windos 7 64-bit as taught in our school –  Great mailz Sep 20 '12 at 18:17
1  
Well, insert 'MOV DH,AL' just before 'POP AX' instruction. then after instruction 'MOV DL,AL' you will have the most significant digit (actually its ASCII representation) in the upper half of DX and least significant in lower half of DX. The other way is to load some memory location into register DI and then use stosb instruction each time you get a next digit in AL register. Remember, that the stos instruction behavior is affected by direction bit in PSW. Take care) –  Serge Sep 20 '12 at 18:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
MOV BL,35H
MOV AL,39H
ADD AL,BL

DAA          # al = 74h = 0111.0100

XOR AH,AH    # ah = 0 (just in case it wasn't)
             # ax = 0000.0000.0111.0100

ROR AX,4     # ax = 0100.0000.0000.0111 = 4007h
SHR AH,4     # ax = 0000.0100.0000.0111 = 0407h
ADD AX,3030h # ax = 0011.0100.0011.0111 = 3437h = ASCII "74" (reversed due to little endian)

Now you simply copy AX to a buffer and print it.

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1  
+100 , Awesome !! –  Great mailz Sep 21 '12 at 13:59

You can either print the result as individual characters ('7' for 7 and '4' for 4) or combine those characters into a string, append to it the '$' character and print that string (the terminal '$' won't be printed).

DOS has functions for printing individual characters (ah=2, dl=ASCII character code) and $-terminated string (ah=9, ds:dx=address of $-terminated string).

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