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What is the difference between

request.POST.get('sth')

and

request.POST['sth']

Did not find the similar question, both work the same for me, suppose I can use them separately but maybe I am wrong, that is why I am asking. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
up vote 79 down vote accepted

request.POST['sth'] will raise a KeyError exception if 'sth' is not in request.POST.

request.POST.get('sth') will return None if 'sth' is not in request.POST.

Additionally, .get allows you to provide an additional parameter of a default value which is returned if the key is not in the dictionary. For example, request.POST.get('sth', 'mydefaultvalue')

This is the behavior of any python dictionary and is not specific to request.POST.



These two snippets are functionally identical:

First snippet:

try:
    x = request.POST['sth']
except KeyError:
    x = None


Second snippet:

x = request.POST.get('sth')



These two snippets are functionally identical:

First snippet:

try:
    x = request.POST['sth']
except KeyError:
    x = -1


Second snippet:

x = request.POST.get('sth', -1)



These two snippets are functionally identical:

First snippet:

if 'sth' in request.POST:
    x = request.POST['sth']
else:
    x = -1


Second snippet:

x = request.POST.get('sth', -1)
share|improve this answer
    
whow, what a answer, thank you:) – danb333 Sep 20 '12 at 18:43
4  
+1. For mentioning that .get is default behavior for python dictionaries. – Tommy Strand Sep 20 '12 at 20:38
    
"This is the behavior of any python dictionary and is not specific to request.POST" I wish I had read this answer my first day with python... +1! – kikusin Aug 27 '15 at 16:10

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