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This is what I have in my implementation file for one of my classes...

Code Setup #1

@interface MyViewController (PrivateMethods)
- (NSString *)myPrivateMethod;
@end

@implementation MyViewController
- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    NSString *myString = [self myPrivateMethod];
    NSLog(@"%@", myString);
}

- (NSString *)myPrivateMethod
{
    return @"someString";
}
@end

With this code, everything works and it logs "someString".

But shouldn't my code look differently somehow? I actually am using that category by accident (I had copy/pasted something and didn't notice "PrivateMethods" was there; I meant to be using a class extension).

Shouldn't my code actually look like one of the following:

Code Setup #2

@interface MyViewController ()
- (NSString *)myPrivateMethod;
@end

@implementation MyViewController
....

Or:

Code Setup #3

@interface MyViewController (PrivateMethods)
- (NSString *)myPrivateMethod;
@end

@implementation MyViewController (PrivateMethods)
....

What are the nuances behind what is happening in this situation? How is Code Setup #1 different from Code Setup #2?

Edit: Question about Setup #3

What does setting it up like this accomplish? Would this even "work"?

@interface MyViewController (PrivateMethods)
- (NSString *)myPrivateMethod;
@end

@implementation MyViewController
- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    NSString *myString = [self myPrivateMethod];
    NSLog(@"%@", myString);
}
@end

@implementation MyViewController (PrivateMethods)
- (NSString *)myPrivateMethod
{
    return @"someString";
}
@end
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

the selectors just get pushed into the same flat namespace at runtime. the compiler adds no additional code to distinguish that the selector is a method defined in a category (when messaging) --it's all flat.

the categories' symbols are exported differently, but that does not really matter to the runtime once loaded.

you should generally use Setup #3: if a method is declared in a category, it should be defined in the category's @implementation. the compiler will save you occasionally and it is a purer structure. (of course, not every method belongs in a category). Similarly, the declarations in the @interface should be defined in the corresponding @implementation, and definitions of declarations in the class continuation (@interface MONClass ()) should also appear in the primary @implementation:

@implementation MONClass
// add your @interface MONClass definitions here
// also add your @interface MONClass () definitions here
@end

Updated Question

Yes, that would work fine. All you should need to do is #import the header which contains @interface MyViewController (PrivateMethods). I actually do this in some classes to categorize/organize by topic.

Typically, "Private Methods" are declared in the class continuation, but it is not necessary to do so (ivars/properties OTOH…).

share|improve this answer
    
Updating my question with another question about Setup #3. Thanks so far though! –  MikeS Sep 20 '12 at 18:48
2  
I believe it's also significant in this case that (recent) Clang will treat an otherwise-undeclared method's definition as being a declaration for the same @implementation . –  Josh Caswell Sep 20 '12 at 18:49
1  
@MikeS: I'm not sure which compiler version it started with. It's been around for a few Xcode v's, though. At least since 4.2. –  Josh Caswell Sep 20 '12 at 18:54
1  
@JoshCaswell yes, good point (+1). clang now supports parsing of the entire @implementation scope. previously, this was possible, but the restriction was that the definition needed to precede use of the selector. since every @implementation block must be closed, it is a nice addition. –  justin Sep 20 '12 at 19:05
1  
Oh, right, it's just that ordering isn't significant anymore. –  Josh Caswell Sep 20 '12 at 19:13

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