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What is the new naming convention for images for the 4-inch retina display?

For an image named background.png you add @2x to the name (background@2x.png) to tell iOS to use that one for devices with the retina display.

What would the suffix be for iPhone 5's screen size?

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See stackoverflow.com/questions/12518879/… for related information, which is the only "convention" that seems to exist. Otherwise, continue to use @2x as before. –  MarkGranoff Sep 20 '12 at 19:01
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1 Answer

up vote 61 down vote accepted

You can use my #defines to help you with these images:

#define isPhone568 ([[UIDevice currentDevice] userInterfaceIdiom] == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone && [UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.height == 568)
#define iPhone568ImageNamed(image) (isPhone568 ? [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@-568h.%@", [image stringByDeletingPathExtension], [image pathExtension]] : image)
#define iPhone568Image(image) ([UIImage imageNamed:iPhone568ImageNamed(image)])

Just give your images the -568h@2x.png notation, and use iPhone568ImageNamed to get a name for standard name or iPhone 5/new iPod.

Usage example from the comments:

self.view.backgroundColor = [[UIColor alloc] initWithPatternImage:[UIImage imageNamed:iPhone568ImageNamed(@"mainscreen.png")]];
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Q: If the name is passed in as "foo.png" doesn't it end up converting to "foo.png-568h" instead? –  Joe D'Andrea Sep 25 '12 at 18:42
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Ahh, what about this? #define iPhone568ImageNamed(image) (isPhone568 ? [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@-568h.%@", [image stringByDeletingPathExtension], [image pathExtension]] : image) –  Joe D'Andrea Sep 25 '12 at 19:10
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example of this with a background pattern: self.view.backgroundColor = [[UIColor alloc] initWithPatternImage:[UIImage imageNamed:iPhone568ImageNamed(@"mainscreen.png")]]; –  John Riselvato Oct 10 '12 at 4:12
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Do you mean when the device rotates? If so, in veiwDidLayoutSubviews. Otherwise, viewDidLoad is a good candidate. –  Leo Natan Oct 21 '12 at 3:07
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@LudovicLandry It is inevitable if you want to have a precise 1:1 pixel mapping between the image and screen. Your suggestion can and will create upscale artefacts (blurring, for example). –  Leo Natan Dec 19 '12 at 15:25
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